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dc.contributor.authorSaarinen, Taina
dc.contributor.authorEnnser-Kananen, Johanna
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-13T11:51:53Z
dc.date.available2020-10-13T11:51:53Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.citationSaarinen, T., & Ennser-Kananen, J. (2020). Ambivalent English : What We Talk About When We Think We Talk About Language. <i>Nordic Journal of English Studies</i>, <i>19</i>(3), 115-129. <a href="https://doi.org/10.35360/njes.581" target="_blank">https://doi.org/10.35360/njes.581</a>
dc.identifier.otherCONVID_42494391
dc.identifier.urihttps://jyx.jyu.fi/handle/123456789/72159
dc.description.abstractThe ambivalence of English manifests itself in the discourses that surround it. English may be a resource and consume resources; it empowers and oppresses. The dichotomous discussion around the usefulness or dangers of English as a “global” or “world” language erases problematizations of the layered societal implications of English in localised contexts. English needs to be analysed not (only) as a language but (also) as the ideologies and societal structures intertwined with it. We examine English in two higher education contexts. Our first case deals with the so-called Accent Reduction courses offered for international students in US universities. The second one analyses English as a language political catalyst in a nation state context. We conclude with a discussion of the nativist and nation-state-centred role of global English. We argue that to discuss English as a language oversimplifies the societal implications of the debate. When we think we talk about English, we are, in fact, talking about the various societal, political, economic, cultural and historical power dynamics that accompany it.en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageeng
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherGöteborg University
dc.relation.ispartofseriesNordic Journal of English Studies
dc.relation.urihttps://njes-journal.com/articles/581/galley/510/download/
dc.rightsCC BY 3.0
dc.subject.otherEnglish
dc.subject.otherinternationalisation of higher education
dc.subject.othernation-state centeredness
dc.subject.otherlanguage as societal structure
dc.subject.otherlanguage as ideology
dc.titleAmbivalent English : What We Talk About When We Think We Talk About Language
dc.typearticle
dc.identifier.urnURN:NBN:fi:jyu-202010136208
dc.contributor.laitosKieli- ja viestintätieteiden laitosfi
dc.contributor.laitosKoulutuksen tutkimuslaitosfi
dc.contributor.laitosDepartment of Language and Communication Studiesen
dc.contributor.laitosFinnish Institute for Educational Researchen
dc.contributor.oppiaineEnglannin kielifi
dc.contributor.oppiaineEnglishen
dc.type.urihttp://purl.org/eprint/type/JournalArticle
dc.description.reviewstatuspeerReviewed
dc.format.pagerange115-129
dc.relation.issn1502-7694
dc.relation.numberinseries3
dc.relation.volume19
dc.type.versionpublishedVersion
dc.rights.copyright© Authors, 2020
dc.rights.accesslevelopenAccessfi
dc.subject.ysoenglannin kieli
dc.subject.ysokielipolitiikka
dc.subject.ysokansallisvaltio
dc.subject.ysoambivalenssi
dc.subject.ysoideologiat
dc.subject.ysoyhteiskunnalliset vaikutukset
dc.subject.ysokielenkäyttö
dc.format.contentfulltext
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p2573
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p9310
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p18250
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p26852
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p216
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p7128
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p11302
dc.rights.urlhttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/
dc.relation.doi10.35360/njes.581


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