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dc.contributor.authorLiu, Jia
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Chi
dc.contributor.authorZhu, Yongjie
dc.contributor.authorLiu, Yunmeng
dc.contributor.authorSun, Hongjin
dc.contributor.authorRistaniemi, Tapani
dc.contributor.authorCong, Fengyu
dc.contributor.authorParviainen, Tiina
dc.date.accessioned2020-07-01T07:50:21Z
dc.date.available2020-07-01T07:50:21Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.citationLiu, J., Zhang, C., Zhu, Y., Liu, Y., Sun, H., Ristaniemi, T., Cong, F., & Parviainen, T. (2020). Dissociable Effects of Reward on P300 and EEG Spectra Under Conditions of High vs. Low Vigilance During a Selective Visual Attention Task. <i>Frontiers in Human Neuroscience</i>, <i>14</i>, Article 207. <a href="https://doi.org/10.3389/fnhum.2020.00207" target="_blank">https://doi.org/10.3389/fnhum.2020.00207</a>
dc.identifier.otherCONVID_36051485
dc.identifier.urihttps://jyx.jyu.fi/handle/123456789/71002
dc.description.abstractThe influence of motivation on selective visual attention in states of high vs. low vigilance is poorly understood. To explore the possible differences in the influence of motivation on behavioral performance and neural activity in high and low vigilance levels, we conducted a prolonged 2 h 20 min flanker task and provided monetary rewards during the 20- to 40- and 100- to 120-min intervals of task performance. Both the behavioral and electrophysiological measures were modulated by prolonged task engagement. Moreover, the effect of reward was different in high vs. low vigilance states. The monetary reward increased accuracy and decreased the reaction time (RT) and number of omitted responses in the low but not in the high vigilance state. The fatigue-related decrease in P300 amplitude recovered to its level in the high vigilance state by manipulating motivation, whereas the fatigue-related increase in P300 latency was not modulated by reward. Additionally, the fatigue-related increase in event-related spectral power at 1–4 Hz was sensitive to vigilance decrement and reward. However, the spectral power at 4–8 Hz was only affected by the decrease in vigilance. These electrophysiological measures were not influenced by motivation in the state of high vigilance. Our results suggest that neural processing capacity, but not the timing of processing, is sensitive to motivation. These findings also imply that the fatigue-related impairments in behavioral performance and neural activity underlying selective visual attention only partly recover after manipulating motivation. Furthermore, our results provide evidence for the dissociable neural mechanisms underlying the fatigue-related decrease vs. reward-related increase in attentional resources.en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageeng
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherFrontiers Media
dc.relation.ispartofseriesFrontiers in Human Neuroscience
dc.rightsCC BY 4.0
dc.subject.othervigilance
dc.subject.othermental fatigue
dc.subject.othermotivation
dc.subject.otherselective visual attention
dc.subject.otherevent-related potential
dc.subject.otherevent-related spectral perturbation
dc.titleDissociable Effects of Reward on P300 and EEG Spectra Under Conditions of High vs. Low Vigilance During a Selective Visual Attention Task
dc.typearticle
dc.identifier.urnURN:NBN:fi:jyu-202007015185
dc.contributor.laitosPsykologian laitosfi
dc.contributor.laitosInformaatioteknologian tiedekuntafi
dc.contributor.laitosDepartment of Psychologyen
dc.contributor.laitosFaculty of Information Technologyen
dc.contributor.oppiaineTietotekniikkafi
dc.contributor.oppiaineMonitieteinen aivotutkimuskeskusfi
dc.contributor.oppiaineMathematical Information Technologyen
dc.contributor.oppiaineCentre for Interdisciplinary Brain Researchen
dc.type.urihttp://purl.org/eprint/type/JournalArticle
dc.description.reviewstatuspeerReviewed
dc.relation.issn1662-5161
dc.relation.volume14
dc.type.versionpublishedVersion
dc.rights.copyright© 2020 Liu, Zhang, Zhu, Liu, Sun, Ristaniemi, Cong and Parviainen
dc.rights.accesslevelopenAccessfi
dc.relation.grantnumber295076
dc.subject.ysokognitiivinen neurotiede
dc.subject.ysoväsymys
dc.subject.ysotarkkaavaisuus
dc.subject.ysoEEG
dc.subject.ysovireys
dc.subject.ysomotivaatio
dc.format.contentfulltext
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p23133
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p128
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p9105
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p3328
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p25809
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p4734
dc.rights.urlhttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.relation.doi10.3389/fnhum.2020.00207
dc.relation.funderSuomen Akatemiafi
dc.relation.funderAcademy of Finlanden
jyx.fundingprogramAkatemiahanke, SAfi
jyx.fundingprogramAcademy Project, AoFen
jyx.fundinginformationThis work was supported by the National Science Foundation of China (No. 91748105, No. 61703069), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities in Dalian University of Technology in China (DUT2019), the Academy of Finland grant (No. 295076), and the scholarships from China Scholarship Council (No. 201600090044; No. 201600090042). Open access funding was provided by the University of Jyväskylä (JYU).


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