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dc.contributor.authorHuizink, A.C.
dc.contributor.authorBartels, M.
dc.contributor.authorRose, R.J.
dc.contributor.authorPulkkinen, Lea
dc.contributor.authorEriksson, C.J.P.
dc.contributor.authorKaprio, J.
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-25T12:26:43Z
dc.date.available2019-09-25T12:26:43Z
dc.date.issued2008fi
dc.identifier.citationHuizink, A. C., Bartels, M., Rose, R. J., Pulkkinen, L., Eriksson, C. J. P., & Kaprio, J. (2008). Chernobyl exposure as stressor during pregnancy and hormone levels in adolescent offspring. <em>Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health</em>, 62 (4), e5. <a href="https://doi.org/10.1136/jech.2007.060350">doi:10.1136/jech.2007.060350</a>fi
dc.identifier.otherTUTKAID_31610
dc.identifier.urihttps://jyx.jyu.fi/handle/123456789/65648
dc.description.abstractBackground: Animal research suggests a programming effect of prenatal stress in the fetal period, resulting in disruptions in behavioural and neuromotor development. Physiological changes that mediate these effects include alterations in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and in testosterone levels. This human study focuses on changes related to these physiological systems after prenatal stress exposure. Methods: We examined the potential effect of prenatal stress associated with the Chernobyl disaster in an ongoing genetic epidemiological study in Finland. One birth cohort of twins (n = 121 twin pairs) was exposed in utero to maternal stress, and their saliva cortisol and testosterone levels at age 14 were compared with twins (n = 157 twin pairs) born one year later. Results: Cortisol levels in both sexes and testosterone levels among females were significantly elevated after prenatal exposure to maternal stress from the second trimester onwards, compared to reference groups of non-exposed adolescents. Exposure explains 3% of variance (p<0.05) in cortisol levels and 18% of variance in testosterone levels (p<0.001). No significant differences were found for exposure from either first or third trimester onwards. Conclusion: Our results suggest that prenatal exposure to maternal stress in the second trimester of pregnancy may have resulted in prenatal programming of physiological systems relating to cortisol and testosterone levels.fi
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofseriesJournal of Epidemiology and Community Health
dc.relation.urihttp://jech.bmj.com/cgi/reprint/62/4/e5
dc.rightsIn Copyright
dc.subject.otherraskausfi
dc.titleChernobyl exposure as stressor during pregnancy and hormone levels in adolescent offspringfi
dc.typearticle
dc.identifier.urnURN:NBN:fi:jyu-201909114102
dc.contributor.laitosPsykologian laitosfi
dc.contributor.laitosDepartment of Psychologyen
dc.contributor.oppiainePsykologia (ytk)
dc.type.urihttp://purl.org/eprint/type/JournalArticle
dc.date.updated2019-09-11T09:15:25Z
dc.description.reviewstatuspeerReviewed
dc.format.pagerangee5
dc.relation.issn1470-2738
dc.relation.numberinseries4
dc.relation.volume62
dc.type.versionacceptedVersion
dc.rights.copyright© 2008 BMJ Publishing Group
dc.rights.accesslevelopenAccessfi
dc.format.contentfulltext
dc.rights.urlhttp://rightsstatements.org/page/InC/1.0/?language=en
dc.relation.doi10.1136/jech.2007.060350


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