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dc.contributor.authorWiklund, Petri
dc.contributor.authorKarhunen, Ville
dc.contributor.authorRichmond, Rebecca C.
dc.contributor.authorParmar, Priyanka
dc.contributor.authorRodriguez, Alina
dc.contributor.authorDe Silva, Maneka
dc.contributor.authorWielscher, Matthias
dc.contributor.authorRezwan, Faisal I.
dc.contributor.authorRichardson, Tom G.
dc.contributor.authorVeijola, Juha
dc.contributor.authorHerzig, Karl-Heinz
dc.contributor.authorHolloway, John W.
dc.contributor.authorRelton, Caroline L.
dc.contributor.authorSebert, Sylvain
dc.contributor.authorJärvelin, Marjo-Riitta
dc.date.accessioned2019-07-25T05:40:29Z
dc.date.available2019-07-25T05:40:29Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.citationWiklund, P., Karhunen, V., Richmond, R.C., Parmar, P., Rodriguez, A., De Silva, M., Wielscher, M., Rezwan, F.I., Richardson, T.G., Veijola, J. et al. (2019). DNA methylation links prenatal smoking exposure to later life health outcomes in offspring. <em>Clinical Epigenetics</em>, 11, 97. <a href="https://doi.org/10.1186/s13148-019-0683-4">10.1186/s13148-019-0683-4</a>
dc.identifier.otherCONVID_32133109
dc.identifier.urihttps://jyx.jyu.fi/handle/123456789/65110
dc.description.abstractBackground: Maternal smoking during pregnancy is associated with adverse offspring health outcomes across their life course. We hypothesize that DNA methylation is a potential mediator of this relationship. Methods: We examined the association of prenatal maternal smoking with offspring blood DNA methylation in 2821 individuals (age 16 to 48 years) from five prospective birth cohort studies and perform Mendelian randomization and mediation analyses to assess whether methylation markers have causal effects on disease outcomes in the offspring. Results: We identify 69 differentially methylated CpGs in 36 genomic regions (P value < 1 × 10−7) associated with exposure to maternal smoking in adolescents and adults. Mendelian randomization analyses provided evidence for a causal role of four maternal smoking-related CpG sites on an increased risk of inflammatory bowel disease or schizophrenia. Further mediation analyses showed some evidence of cg25189904 in GNG12 gene mediating the effect of exposure to maternal smoking on schizophrenia-related outcomes. Conclusions: DNA methylation may represent a biological mechanism through which maternal smoking is associated with increased risk of psychiatric morbidity in the exposed offspring.en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageeng
dc.publisherBiomed Central
dc.relation.ispartofseriesClinical Epigenetics
dc.rightsCC BY 4.0
dc.subject.othercausality
dc.subject.otherDNA methylation
dc.subject.otherdisease
dc.subject.otherlife course
dc.subject.othermaternal smoking
dc.subject.othermediation
dc.subject.otherpersistence
dc.subject.otherpregnancy
dc.titleDNA methylation links prenatal smoking exposure to later life health outcomes in offspring
dc.typearticle
dc.identifier.urnURN:NBN:fi:jyu-201907253673
dc.contributor.laitosLiikuntatieteellinen tiedekuntafi
dc.contributor.laitosFaculty of Sport and Health Sciencesen
dc.type.urihttp://purl.org/eprint/type/JournalArticle
dc.description.reviewstatuspeerReviewed
dc.relation.issn1868-7075
dc.relation.volume11
dc.type.versionpublishedVersion
dc.rights.copyright© The Author(s) 2019
dc.rights.accesslevelopenAccessfi
dc.subject.ysokausaliteetti
dc.subject.ysoterveysvaikutukset
dc.subject.ysoDNA-metylaatio
dc.subject.ysokohorttitutkimus
dc.subject.ysoraskaus
dc.subject.ysotupakointi
dc.format.contentfulltext
dc.rights.urlhttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.relation.doi10.1186/s13148-019-0683-4


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