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dc.contributor.authorMikkola, Tuija
dc.contributor.authorvon Bonsdorff, Mikaela
dc.contributor.authorOsmond, Clive
dc.contributor.authorSalonen, Minna K.
dc.contributor.authorKajantie, Eero
dc.contributor.authorEriksson, Johan G.
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-22T11:29:41Z
dc.date.available2018-03-02T22:45:06Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.citationMikkola, T., von Bonsdorff, M., Osmond, C., Salonen, M. K., Kajantie, E., & Eriksson, J. G. (2017). Association of Body Size at Birth and Childhood Growth with Hip Fractures in Older Age : An Exploratory Follow-up of the Helsinki Birth Cohort Study. <i>Journal of Bone and Mineral Research</i>, <i>32</i>(6), 1194-1200. <a href="https://doi.org/10.1002/jbmr.3100" target="_blank">https://doi.org/10.1002/jbmr.3100</a>
dc.identifier.otherCONVID_26547449
dc.identifier.otherTUTKAID_72979
dc.identifier.urihttps://jyx.jyu.fi/handle/123456789/54655
dc.description.abstractChildhood growth has been linked with bone properties in adulthood, whereas less is known about the contribution of early growth to bone fracture risk. We investigated the association of body size at birth and childhood growth with hip fractures and pharmacotherapy for osteoporosis in older age. Men and women, born full term, from the Helsinki Birth Cohort Study (n = 8345) were followed until the age of 68 to 80 years. Height and weight from birth to 11 years were obtained from health care records and diagnoses of hip fractures and osteoporosis drug purchases from national registers. Independent associations of each age period were analyzed using Cox models adjusted for age, childhood and adulthood socioeconomic status, and drugs affecting bone metabolism. In men, the risk of hip fractures was nonlinearly associated with childhood growth. Compared to intermediate increase, low and high increase in height between 2 and 7 years (p < 0.001) were associated with all hip fractures and hip fractures sustained after the age of 50 years. Further, compared to intermediate gain, low and high gain in BMI between 7 and 11 years (p = 0.001) were associated with greater risk of hip fractures in men. In women, growth was not associated with the risk of hip fractures but greater weight (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.85; 95% CI, 0.77 to 0.94; p = 0.001) and BMI (HR 0.86; 95% CI, 0.78 to 0.95; p = 0.003) gain between ages 2 and 7 years were associated with a decreased risk of pharmacotherapy for osteoporosis. In men, growth was not associated with the risk of pharmacotherapy for osteoporosis. In conclusion, growth during childhood may contribute to the risk of hip fractures in later life among men.
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherAmerican Society for Bone and Mineral Research; Wiley
dc.relation.ispartofseriesJournal of Bone and Mineral Research
dc.subject.otheraging
dc.subject.otherdevelopmental modeling
dc.subject.othergeneral population studies
dc.subject.othertherapeutics
dc.titleAssociation of Body Size at Birth and Childhood Growth with Hip Fractures in Older Age : An Exploratory Follow-up of the Helsinki Birth Cohort Study
dc.typearticle
dc.identifier.urnURN:NBN:fi:jyu-201706192948
dc.contributor.laitosLiikuntatieteellinen tiedekuntafi
dc.contributor.laitosFaculty of Sport and Health Sciencesen
dc.contributor.oppiaineGerontologia ja kansanterveysfi
dc.contributor.oppiaineGerontology and Public Healthen
dc.type.urihttp://purl.org/eprint/type/JournalArticle
dc.date.updated2017-06-19T12:15:09Z
dc.type.coarjournal article
dc.description.reviewstatuspeerReviewed
dc.format.pagerange1194-1200
dc.relation.issn0884-0431
dc.relation.numberinseries6
dc.relation.volume32
dc.type.versionacceptedVersion
dc.rights.copyright© 2017 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. This is a final draft version of an article whose final and definitive form has been published by Wiley. Published in this repository with the kind permission of the publisher.
dc.rights.accesslevelopenAccessfi
dc.subject.ysoosteoporoosi
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p10781
dc.relation.doi10.1002/jbmr.3100


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