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dc.contributor.authorKliuchko, Marina
dc.contributor.authorHeinonen-Guzejev, Marja
dc.contributor.authorMonacis, Lucia
dc.contributor.authorGold, Benjamin P.
dc.contributor.authorHeikkilä, Kauko V.
dc.contributor.authorSpinosa, Vittoria
dc.contributor.authorTervaniemi, Mari
dc.contributor.authorBrattico, Elvira
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-13T07:19:20Z
dc.date.available2016-07-13T07:19:20Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.citationKliuchko, M., Heinonen-Guzejev, M., Monacis, L., Gold, B. P., Heikkilä, K. V., Spinosa, V., . . . , & Brattico, E. (2015). The association of noise sensitivity with music listening, training, and aptitude. <em>Noise and Health</em>, 17 (78), 350-357. Retrieved from <a href="http://www.noiseandhealth.org/text.asp?2015/17/78/350/165065">http://www.noiseandhealth.org/text.asp?2015/17/78/350/165065</a>
dc.identifier.otherTUTKAID_67286
dc.identifier.urihttps://jyx.jyu.fi/handle/123456789/50814
dc.description.abstractAfter intensive, long-term musical training, the auditory system of a musician is specifically tuned to perceive musical sounds. We wished to find out whether a musician's auditory system also develops increased sensitivity to any sound of everyday life, experiencing them as noise. For this purpose, an online survey, including questionnaires on noise sensitivity, musical background, and listening tests for assessing musical aptitude, was administered to 197 participants in Finland and Italy. Subjective noise sensitivity (assessed with the Weinstein's Noise Sensitivity Scale) was analyzed for associations with musicianship, musical aptitude, weekly time spent listening to music, and the importance of music in each person's life (or music importance). Subjects were divided into three groups according to their musical expertise: Nonmusicians (N = 103), amateur musicians (N = 44), and professional musicians (N = 50). The results showed that noise sensitivity did not depend on musical expertise or performance on musicality tests or the amount of active (attentive) listening to music. In contrast, it was associated with daily passive listening to music, so that individuals with higher noise sensitivity spent less time in passive (background) listening to music than those with lower sensitivity to noise. Furthermore, noise-sensitive respondents rated music as less important in their life than did individuals with lower sensitivity to noise. The results demonstrate that the special sensitivity of the auditory system derived from musical training does not lead to increased irritability from unwanted sounds. However, the disposition to tolerate contingent musical backgrounds in everyday life depends on the individual's noise sensitivity.
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherMedknow Publications And Media Pvt. Ltd.
dc.relation.ispartofseriesNoise and Health
dc.relation.urihttp://www.noiseandhealth.org/text.asp?2015/17/78/350/165065
dc.subject.othermusic listening
dc.subject.otherMusical aptitude
dc.subject.othermusical expertise
dc.subject.othernoise sensitivity
dc.titleThe association of noise sensitivity with music listening, training, and aptitude
dc.typearticle
dc.identifier.urnURN:NBN:fi:jyu-201607073527
dc.contributor.laitosMusiikin laitosfi
dc.contributor.laitosDepartment of Musicen
dc.contributor.oppiaineMusiikkitiede
dc.type.urihttp://purl.org/eprint/type/JournalArticle
dc.date.updated2016-07-07T12:15:15Z
dc.type.coarjournal article
dc.description.reviewstatuspeerReviewed
dc.format.pagerange350-357
dc.relation.issn1463-1741
dc.relation.volume17
dc.type.versionpublishedVersion
dc.rights.copyright© the Authors & Medknow Publications And Media Pvt. Ltd, 2015.
dc.rights.accesslevelopenAccessfi


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