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dc.contributor.authorTorppa, Minna
dc.contributor.authorEklund, Kenneth
dc.contributor.authorvan Bergen, Elsje
dc.contributor.authorLyytinen, Heikki
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-05T09:38:28Z
dc.date.available2016-03-17T22:45:05Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.citationTorppa, M., Eklund, K., van Bergen, E., & Lyytinen, H. (2015). Late-Emerging and Resolving Dyslexia: A Follow-Up Study from Age 3 to 14. <em>Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology</em>, 43 (7), 1389-1401. <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10802-015-0003-1">doi:10.1007/s10802-015-0003-1</a>
dc.identifier.otherTUTKAID_65716
dc.identifier.urihttps://jyx.jyu.fi/handle/123456789/48250
dc.description.abstractThis study focuses on the stability of dyslexia status from Grade 2 to Grade 8 in four groups: (a) no dyslexia in either grade (no-dyslexia, n = 127); (b) no dyslexia in Grade 2 but dyslexia in Grade 8 (late-emerging, n = 18); (c) dyslexia in Grade 2 but not in Grade 8 (resolving, n = 15); and (d) dyslexia in both grades (persistent-dyslexia, n = 22). We examined group differences from age 3.5 to age 14 in (a) reading, vocabulary, phonology, letter knowledge, rapid naming, IQ, verbal memory; (b) familial and environmental risk and supportive factors; and (c) parental skills in reading, phonology, rapid naming, verbal memory, and vocabulary. Our findings showed group differences both in reading and cognitive skills of children as well as their parents. Parental education, book-reading frequency, and children’s IQ, however, did not differentiate the groups. The children in the persistent-dyslexia group exhibited widespread language and cognitive deficits across development. Those in the resolving group had problems in language and cognitive skills only prior to school entry. In the late-emerging group, children showed clearly compromised rapid naming. Additionally, their parents had the most severe difficulties in rapid naming, a finding that suggests strong genetic liability. The findings show instability in the diagnosis of dyslexia. The members of the late-emerging group did not have a distinct early cognitive profile, so late-emerging dyslexia appears difficult to predict. Indeed, these children are at risk of not being identified and not receiving required support. This study suggests the need for continued monitoring of children’s progress in literacy after the early school years.
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherSpringer US; International Society for Research in Child and Adolescent Psychopathology
dc.relation.ispartofseriesJournal of Abnormal Child Psychology
dc.subject.otherDyslexia
dc.subject.otherEarly identification
dc.subject.otherFamily risk for dyslexia
dc.subject.otherLate-emerging dyslexia
dc.subject.otherReading disabilities
dc.titleLate-Emerging and Resolving Dyslexia: A Follow-Up Study from Age 3 to 14
dc.typearticle
dc.identifier.urnURN:NBN:fi:jyu-201601051013
dc.contributor.laitosOpettajankoulutuslaitosfi
dc.contributor.laitosPsykologian laitosfi
dc.contributor.laitosDepartment of Teacher Educationen
dc.contributor.laitosDepartment of Psychologyen
dc.contributor.oppiaineKasvatuspsykologia
dc.contributor.oppiainePsykologia
dc.type.urihttp://purl.org/eprint/type/JournalArticle
dc.date.updated2016-01-05T07:15:09Z
dc.type.coarjournal article
dc.description.reviewstatuspeerReviewed
dc.format.pagerange1389-1401
dc.relation.issn0091-0627
dc.relation.volume43
dc.type.versionacceptedVersion
dc.rights.copyright© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2015. This is a final draft version of an article whose final and definitive form has been published by Springer. Published in this repository with the kind permission of the publisher.
dc.rights.accesslevelopenAccessfi
dc.relation.doi10.1007/s10802-015-0003-1


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