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dc.contributor.authorNieminen, Pasi
dc.contributor.authorSavinainen, Antti
dc.contributor.authorViiri, Jouni
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-08T05:14:10Z
dc.date.available2013-05-08T05:14:10Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.identifier.citationNieminen, P., Savinainen, A., & Viiri, J. (2012). Relations between representational consistency, conceptual understanding of the force concept, and scientific reasoning. <i>Physical Review Special Topics - Physics Education Research</i>, <i>8</i>(1), 010123. <a href="https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevSTPER.8.010123" target="_blank">https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevSTPER.8.010123</a>
dc.identifier.otherCONVID_21516430
dc.identifier.otherTUTKAID_51215
dc.identifier.urihttps://jyx.jyu.fi/handle/123456789/41333
dc.description.abstractPrevious physics education research has raised the question of “hidden variables” behind students’ success in learning certain concepts. In the context of the force concept, it has been suggested that students’ reasoning ability is one such variable. Strong positive correlations between students’ preinstruction scores for reasoning ability (measured by Lawson’s Classroom Test of Scientific Reasoning) and their learning of forces [measured by the Force Concept Inventory (FCI)] have been reported in high school and university introductory courses. However, there is no published research concerning the relation between students’ ability to interpret multiple representations consistently (i.e., representational consistency) and their learning of forces. To investigate this, we collected 131 high school students’ pre- and post-test data of the Representational Variant of the Force Concept Inventory (for representational consistency) and the FCI. The students’ Lawson pretest data were also collected. We found that the preinstruction level of students’ representational consistency correlated strongly with student learning gain of forces. The correlation (0.51) was almost equal to the correlation between Lawson prescore and learning gain of forces (0.52). Our results support earlier findings which suggest that scientific reasoning ability is a hidden variable behind the learning of forces. In addition, we suggest that students’ representational consistency may also be such a factor, and that this should be recognized in physics teaching.fi
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherAmerican Physical Society
dc.relation.ispartofseriesPhysical Review Special Topics - Physics Education Research
dc.relation.urihttp://link.aps.org/doi/10.1103/PhysRevSTPER.8.010123
dc.rightsCC BY 3.0
dc.subject.otherkonsistenssi
dc.subject.othervoiman käsite
dc.subject.othertieteellinen päättelykyky
dc.subject.othermultiple representations
dc.subject.otherrepresentational consistency
dc.subject.otherforce concept
dc.subject.otherscientific reasoning
dc.titleRelations between representational consistency, conceptual understanding of the force concept, and scientific reasoning
dc.typearticle
dc.identifier.urnURN:NBN:fi:jyu-201305031546
dc.contributor.laitosOpettajankoulutuslaitosfi
dc.contributor.laitosDepartment of Teacher Educationen
dc.contributor.oppiaineMatematiikka ja luonnontieteetfi
dc.contributor.oppiaineMatematiikka ja luonnontieteeten
dc.type.urihttp://purl.org/eprint/type/JournalArticle
dc.date.updated2013-05-03T10:20:19Z
dc.type.coarjournal article
dc.description.reviewstatuspeerReviewed
dc.format.pagerange010123
dc.relation.issn1554-9178
dc.relation.numberinseries1
dc.relation.volume8
dc.type.versionpublishedVersion
dc.rights.copyright© the Authors, 2012.
dc.rights.accesslevelopenAccessfi
dc.subject.ysorepresentaatio
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p1407
dc.rights.urlhttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/
dc.relation.doi10.1103/PhysRevSTPER.8.010123


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