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dc.contributor.authorPalmberg, Lotta
dc.contributor.authorRantalainen, Timo
dc.contributor.authorRantakokko, Merja
dc.contributor.authorKaravirta, Laura
dc.contributor.authorSiltanen, Sini
dc.contributor.authorSkantz, Heidi
dc.contributor.authorSaajanaho, Milla
dc.contributor.authorPortegijs, Erja
dc.contributor.authorRantanen, Taina
dc.date.accessioned2020-07-06T06:51:04Z
dc.date.available2020-07-06T06:51:04Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.citationPalmberg, L., Rantalainen, T., Rantakokko, M., Karavirta, L., Siltanen, S., Skantz, H., Saajanaho, M., Portegijs, E., & Rantanen, T. (2020). The Associations of Activity Fragmentation with Physical and Mental Fatigability among Community-Dwelling 75-, 80- and 85-Year-Old People. <i>Journals of Gerontology Series A : Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences</i>, <i>75</i>(9), e103–e110. <a href="https://doi.org/10.1093/gerona/glaa166" target="_blank">https://doi.org/10.1093/gerona/glaa166</a>
dc.identifier.otherCONVID_36272170
dc.identifier.urihttps://jyx.jyu.fi/handle/123456789/71071
dc.description.abstractBackground Fatigue related to task standardized by duration and intensity, termed fatigability, could manifest as shortening of activity bouts throughout the day causing daily activity to accumulate in a more fragmented pattern. Our purpose was to study the association of activity fragmentation with physical and mental dimensions of fatigability. Methods A cross-sectional study of 485 community-dwelling 75-,80- and 85-year-old people using a thigh-worn accelerometer for 3 to 7 days. Activity fragmentation was studied as Active-to-Sedentary Transition Probability (ASTP) for two operational definitions of physical activity: accelerations equivalent to at least light physical activity, and for upright posture. Physical fatigability was assessed as perceived exertion fatigability, performance fatigability severity, and with the Physical Fatigue Subscale of the Situational Fatigue Scale (SFS). Mental fatigability was assessed with the Mental Fatigue Subscale of the SFS and as a decrease in perceived mental alertness after a six-minute walk test (6MWT). Results Higher activity fragmentation was associated with higher self-reported physical fatigability, perceived exertion fatigability and performance fatigability severity, independent of total activity minutes (β 0.13-0.33, p<0.05 for all). Higher activity fragmentation was not associated with mental fatigability in the fully adjusted models. The associations with fatigability indices were similar for both activity fragmentation indicators. Associations of activity fragmentation and performance fatigability severity were similar also among those with the highest intensity-based physical activity volume. Conclusions The findings provide support that studying fragmented activity patterns can be useful in identifying those at risk for high fatigability, even among those with relatively high physical activity level.en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageeng
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherOxford University Press (OUP)
dc.relation.ispartofseriesJournals of Gerontology Series A : Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences
dc.rightsIn Copyright
dc.subject.otheractivity patterns
dc.subject.otheradaptive strategies
dc.subject.otherfatigue
dc.subject.otherphysical activity
dc.titleThe Associations of Activity Fragmentation with Physical and Mental Fatigability among Community-Dwelling 75-, 80- and 85-Year-Old People
dc.typearticle
dc.identifier.urnURN:NBN:fi:jyu-202007065244
dc.contributor.laitosLiikuntatieteellinen tiedekuntafi
dc.contributor.laitosFaculty of Sport and Health Sciencesen
dc.contributor.oppiaineGerontologia ja kansanterveysfi
dc.contributor.oppiaineBiomekaniikkafi
dc.contributor.oppiaineGerontology and Public Healthen
dc.contributor.oppiaineBiomechanicsen
dc.type.urihttp://purl.org/eprint/type/JournalArticle
dc.description.reviewstatuspeerReviewed
dc.format.pagerangee103–e110
dc.relation.issn1079-5006
dc.relation.numberinseries9
dc.relation.volume75
dc.type.versionacceptedVersion
dc.rights.copyright© The Author(s) 2020
dc.rights.accesslevelopenAccessfi
dc.relation.grantnumber321336
dc.relation.grantnumber693045
dc.relation.grantnumber693045
dc.relation.grantnumber328818
dc.relation.projectidinfo:eu-repo/grantAgreement/EC/H2020/693045/EU//AGNES
dc.subject.ysoväsymys
dc.subject.ysoliikunta
dc.subject.ysofyysinen aktiivisuus
dc.subject.ysofyysinen hyvinvointi
dc.subject.ysohenkinen hyvinvointi
dc.subject.ysoikääntyneet
dc.format.contentfulltext
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p128
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p916
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p23102
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p38424
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p1946
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p2433
dc.rights.urlhttp://rightsstatements.org/page/InC/1.0/?language=en
dc.relation.doi10.1093/gerona/glaa166
dc.relation.funderSuomen Akatemiafi
dc.relation.funderEuroopan komissiofi
dc.relation.funderSuomen Akatemiafi
dc.relation.funderAcademy of Finlanden
dc.relation.funderEuropean Commissionen
dc.relation.funderAcademy of Finlanden
jyx.fundingprogramAkatemiatutkijan tehtävä, SAfi
jyx.fundingprogramERC European Research Council, H2020fi
jyx.fundingprogramAkatemiatutkijan tutkimuskulut, SAfi
jyx.fundingprogramResearch post as Academy Research Fellow, AoFen
jyx.fundingprogramERC European Research Council, H2020en
jyx.fundingprogramResearch costs of Academy Research Fellow, AoFen
jyx.fundinginformationThis work was supported by the European Research Council (grant number 693045 [to TaR]); the Academy of Finland (grant numbers 321336 and 328818 [to TiR], grant number 310526 [to TaR]); the Finnish Ministry of Education and Culture [to MR and EP] and the University of Jyvaskyla.


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