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dc.contributor.authorLaukkanen, Jari A.
dc.contributor.authorVoutilainen, Ari
dc.contributor.authorKurl, Sudhir
dc.contributor.authorAraujo, Claudio Gil S.
dc.contributor.authorJae, Sae Young
dc.contributor.authorKunutsor, Setor K.
dc.date.accessioned2020-04-22T07:37:27Z
dc.date.available2020-04-22T07:37:27Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.citationLaukkanen, J. A., Voutilainen, A., Kurl, S., Araujo, C. G. S., Jae, S. Y., & Kunutsor, S. K. (2020). Handgrip strength is inversely associated with fatal cardiovascular and all-cause mortality events. <i>Annals of Medicine</i>, <i>52</i>(3-4), 109-119. <a href="https://doi.org/10.1080/07853890.2020.1748220" target="_blank">https://doi.org/10.1080/07853890.2020.1748220</a>
dc.identifier.otherCONVID_35144136
dc.identifier.urihttps://jyx.jyu.fi/handle/123456789/68640
dc.description.abstractPurpose: We aimed to assess the associations of handgrip strength (HS) with cardiovascular and all-cause mortality and whether adding data on HS to cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors is associated with improvement in CVD mortality prediction. Design: Handgrip strength was assessed in a population-based sample of 861 participants aged 61-74 years at baseline. Relative HS was obtained by dividing the absolute value by body weight. Results: During a median (interquartile range) follow-up of 17.3 (12.6-18.4) years, 116 fatal coronary heart diseases (CHDs), 195 fatal CVDs, and 412 all-cause mortality events occurred. On adjustment for several risk factors, the hazard ratios (95% CIs) for fatal CHD, fatal CVD, and all-cause mortality were 0.59 (0.37-0.95), 0.59 (0.41-0.86), and 0.66 (0.51-0.84) respectively comparing extreme tertiles of relative HS. Adding relative HS to a CVD mortality risk prediction model containing established risk factors did not improve discrimination or reclassification using Harrel’s C-index (C-index change: 0.0034; p = 0.65), integrated-discrimination-improvement (0.0059; p = 0.20), and net-reclassification-improvement (-1.31%; p = 0.74); however, there was a significant difference in in -2 log likelihood (p < 0.001). Conclusion: Relative HS is inversely associated with CHD, CVD and all-cause mortality events. Adding relative HS to conventional risk factors improves CVD risk assessment using sensitive measures of discrimination.en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageeng
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTaylor & Francis
dc.relation.ispartofseriesAnnals of Medicine
dc.rightsIn Copyright
dc.subject.otherhandgrip strength
dc.subject.othercardiovascular disease
dc.subject.othermortality
dc.subject.otherrisk prediction
dc.titleHandgrip strength is inversely associated with fatal cardiovascular and all-cause mortality events
dc.typearticle
dc.identifier.urnURN:NBN:fi:jyu-202004222848
dc.contributor.laitosLiikuntatieteellinen tiedekuntafi
dc.contributor.laitosFaculty of Sport and Health Sciencesen
dc.contributor.oppiaineLiikuntalääketiedefi
dc.contributor.oppiaineSports and Exercise Medicineen
dc.type.urihttp://purl.org/eprint/type/JournalArticle
dc.description.reviewstatuspeerReviewed
dc.format.pagerange109-119
dc.relation.issn0785-3890
dc.relation.numberinseries3-4
dc.relation.volume52
dc.type.versionacceptedVersion
dc.rights.copyright© 2020 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group
dc.rights.accesslevelopenAccessfi
dc.subject.ysosydän- ja verisuonitaudit
dc.subject.ysokuolleisuus
dc.subject.ysopuristusvoima
dc.subject.ysoriskinarviointi
dc.format.contentfulltext
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p9886
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p5003
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p25078
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p6079
dc.rights.urlhttp://rightsstatements.org/page/InC/1.0/?language=en
dc.relation.doi10.1080/07853890.2020.1748220
jyx.fundinginformationThis work has been supported in part by grants from the Finnish Foundation for Cardiovascular Research, Helsinki, Finland. Dr. Setor K. Kunutsor acknowledges support from the NIHR Biomedical Research Centre at the University Hospitals Bristol NHS Foundation Trust and the University of Bristol. The views expressed in this publication are those of the author and not necessarily those of the NHS, the National Institute for Health Research or the Department of Health.


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