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dc.contributor.authorTarkka, Ina
dc.contributor.authorHautasaari, Pekka
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-14T08:36:20Z
dc.date.available2020-10-01T21:35:10Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.citationTarkka, I., & Hautasaari, P. (2019). Motor action execution in reaction-time movements : Magnetoencephalographic study. <i>American Journal of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation</i>, <i>98</i>(9), 771-776. https://doi.org/10.1097/PHM.0000000000001187
dc.identifier.otherCONVID_28997834
dc.identifier.otherTUTKAID_81109
dc.identifier.urihttps://jyx.jyu.fi/handle/123456789/65852
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: Reaction-time movements are internally planned in the brain. Presumably, proactive control in reaction-time movements appears as an inhibitory phase preceding movement execution. We identified the brain activity of reaction-time movements in close proximity to movement onset and compared it with similar self-paced voluntary movements without external command. DESIGN: We recorded 18 healthy participants performing reaction-time and self-paced fast index finger abductions with 306-sensor magnetoencephalography and electromyography. Reaction-time movements were performed as responses to cutaneous electrical stimulation delivered on the hand radial nerve area. Motor field and movement-evoked field 1 corresponding to the sensorimotor cortex activity during motor execution and afferent feedback after the movement were analyzed with Brainstorm's scouts using regions of interest analysis. RESULTS: Primary motor and somato sensory cortices were active before and after movement onset. During reaction-time movements, primary motor and somato sensory cortices showed higher activation compared with self-paced movements. In primary motor cortex, stronger preparatory activity was seen in self-paced than in reaction time task. CONCLUSIONS: Both primary motor and somato sensory cortices participated in the movement execution and in the prediction of sensory consequences of movement. Cutaneous stimulation facilitated cortical activation during motor field after reaction-time movements, implying the applicability of cutaneous stimulation in motor rehabilitation.fi
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageeng
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherWolters Kluwer Health, Inc
dc.relation.ispartofseriesAmerican Journal of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
dc.rightsIn Copyright
dc.subject.othervoluntary movement
dc.subject.othermovement-related cortical field
dc.subject.othermotor cortex
dc.subject.othersensory cortex
dc.titleMotor action execution in reaction-time movements : Magnetoencephalographic study
dc.typearticle
dc.identifier.urnURN:NBN:fi:jyu-201910094369
dc.contributor.laitosLiikuntatieteellinen tiedekuntafi
dc.contributor.laitosFaculty of Sport and Health Sciencesen
dc.contributor.oppiaineLiikuntalääketiedefi
dc.contributor.oppiaineMonitieteinen aivotutkimuskeskusfi
dc.contributor.oppiaineSports and Exercise Medicineen
dc.contributor.oppiaineCentre for Interdisciplinary Brain Researchen
dc.type.urihttp://purl.org/eprint/type/JournalArticle
dc.date.updated2019-10-09T09:15:19Z
dc.description.reviewstatuspeerReviewed
dc.format.pagerange771-776
dc.relation.issn0894-9115
dc.relation.numberinseries9
dc.relation.volume98
dc.type.versionacceptedVersion
dc.rights.copyright© 2019 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc.
dc.rights.accesslevelopenAccessfi
dc.subject.ysoaivokuori
dc.subject.ysomotoriikka
dc.subject.ysoMEG
dc.format.contentfulltext
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p7039
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p496
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p3329
dc.rights.urlhttp://rightsstatements.org/page/InC/1.0/?language=en
dc.relation.doi10.1097/PHM.0000000000001187


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