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dc.contributor.authorLeandro, Camila
dc.contributor.authorJones, Mirkka
dc.contributor.authorPerrin, William
dc.contributor.authorJay-Robert, Pierre
dc.contributor.authorOvaskainen, Otso
dc.date.accessioned2024-02-12T12:09:25Z
dc.date.available2024-02-12T12:09:25Z
dc.date.issued2023
dc.identifier.citationLeandro, C., Jones, M., Perrin, W., Jay-Robert, P., & Ovaskainen, O. (2023). Dung beetle community patterns in Western Europe : responses of Scarabaeinae to landscape and environmental filtering. <i>Landscape Ecology</i>, <i>38</i>, 2323-2338. <a href="https://doi.org/10.1007/s10980-023-01711-0" target="_blank">https://doi.org/10.1007/s10980-023-01711-0</a>
dc.identifier.otherCONVID_183984836
dc.identifier.urihttps://jyx.jyu.fi/handle/123456789/93338
dc.description.abstractContext Mediterranean landscapes from Europe have undergone recent biodiversity changes. The intensification of human activities and the fragmentation of open habitats now affect many taxonomic groups, such as dung beetles, which have benefited from centuries of extensive herding. Nevertheless, dung beetles’ responses to landscape composition have been rarely investigated in this context. Objectives We explored how dung beetle communities (species occurrences, abundances and traits) were influenced by temperature and by soil and landscape characteristics and examined residual co-occurrence patterns that may reflect interspecific interactions. Methods We used an extensive dataset on Scarabaeinae dung beetles from southern France (31 species, 117 sites) to evaluate how landscape composition and fragmentation, climate and soil characteristics jointly influence dung beetle communities across this region. We used hierarchical joint species distribution models to characterize (co)variation in the responses of species and to connect such responses to species-specific traits. Results Temperature, soil and landscape characteristics shape dung beetle communities and species’ thermal tolerance was connected to their soil preferences. Fragmentation was negatively associated with beetle abundance while forest cover was positively associated with species richness and with abundance. There was little evidence of residual associations among dung beetle species, suggesting that species interactions do not play a major role in community assembly. Conclusion K-selected species were over-represented among the rarest species. The effects of fragmentation and forest cover indicate that a conservation plan based on connected, heterogeneous habitats with low-density grazing should be promoted to preserve ecological functions linked to these insects.en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherSpringer
dc.relation.ispartofseriesLandscape Ecology
dc.rightsIn Copyright
dc.subject.otherHMSC
dc.subject.otherlandscape composition
dc.subject.otherfragmentation
dc.subject.othermediterranean
dc.subject.otherconservation
dc.titleDung beetle community patterns in Western Europe : responses of Scarabaeinae to landscape and environmental filtering
dc.typearticle
dc.identifier.urnURN:NBN:fi:jyu-202402121819
dc.contributor.laitosBio- ja ympäristötieteiden laitosfi
dc.contributor.laitosDepartment of Biological and Environmental Scienceen
dc.type.urihttp://purl.org/eprint/type/JournalArticle
dc.type.coarhttp://purl.org/coar/resource_type/c_2df8fbb1
dc.description.reviewstatuspeerReviewed
dc.format.pagerange2323-2338
dc.relation.issn0921-2973
dc.relation.volume38
dc.type.versionacceptedVersion
dc.rights.copyright© The Author(s), under exclusive licence to Springer Nature B.V. 2023
dc.rights.accesslevelembargoedAccessfi
dc.relation.grantnumber856506
dc.relation.grantnumber856506
dc.relation.projectidinfo:eu-repo/grantAgreement/EC/H2020/856506/EU//LIFEPLAN
dc.subject.ysolantakuoriaiset
dc.subject.ysokovakuoriaiset
dc.subject.ysolajit
dc.subject.ysoelinympäristö
dc.subject.ysomaisema
dc.subject.ysobiodiversiteetti
dc.subject.ysomaaperä
dc.format.contentfulltext
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p20074
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p6734
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p2765
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p14074
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p1716
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p5496
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p1675
dc.rights.urlhttp://rightsstatements.org/page/InC/1.0/?language=en
dc.relation.doi10.1007/s10980-023-01711-0
dc.relation.funderEuroopan komissiofi
dc.relation.funderEuropean Commissionen
jyx.fundingprogramERC European Research Council, H2020fi
jyx.fundingprogramERC European Research Council, H2020en
jyx.fundinginformationOO was funded by the Academy of Finland (Grant No. 309581), Jane and Aatos Erkko Foundation, Research Council of Norway through its Centres of Excellence Funding Scheme (223257), and the European Research Council (ERC) under the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme (Grant Agreement No 856506; ERC-synergy project LIFEPLAN). MJ was supported by the Academy of Finland’s ‘Thriving Nature’ research profiling action.
dc.type.okmA1


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