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dc.contributor.authorNokelainen, Ossi
dc.contributor.authorGalarza, Juan A.
dc.contributor.authorKirvesoja, Jimi
dc.contributor.authorSuisto, Kaisa
dc.contributor.authorMappes, Johanna
dc.date.accessioned2022-03-15T11:31:32Z
dc.date.available2022-03-15T11:31:32Z
dc.date.issued2022
dc.identifier.citationNokelainen, O., Galarza, J. A., Kirvesoja, J., Suisto, K., & Mappes, J. (2022). Genetic colour variation visible for predators and conspecifics is concealed from humans in a polymorphic moth. <i>Journal of Evolutionary Biology</i>, <i>35</i>(3), 467-478. <a href="https://doi.org/10.1111/jeb.13994" target="_blank">https://doi.org/10.1111/jeb.13994</a>
dc.identifier.otherCONVID_104514070
dc.identifier.urihttps://jyx.jyu.fi/handle/123456789/80132
dc.description.abstractThe definition of colour polymorphism is intuitive: genetic variants express discretely coloured phenotypes. This classification is, however, elusive as humans form subjective categories or ignore differences that cannot be seen by human eyes. We demonstrate an example of a ‘cryptic morph’ in a polymorphic wood tiger moth (Arctia plantaginis), a phenomenon that may be common among well-studied species. We used pedigree data from nearly 20,000 individuals to infer the inheritance of hindwing colouration. The evidence supports a single Mendelian locus with two alleles in males: WW and Wy produce the white and yy the yellow hindwing colour. The inheritance could not be resolved in females as their hindwing colour varies continuously with no clear link with male genotypes. Next, we investigated if the male genotype can be predicted from their phenotype by machine learning algorithms and by human observers. Linear discriminant analysis grouped male genotypes with 97% accuracy, whereas humans could only group the yy genotype. Using vision modelling, we also tested whether the genotypes have differential discriminability to humans, moth conspecifics and their bird predators. The human perception was poor separating the genotypes, but avian and moth vision models with ultraviolet sensitivity could separate white WW and Wy males. We emphasize the importance of objective methodology when studying colour polymorphism. Our findings indicate that by-eye categorization methods may be problematic, because humans fail to see differences that can be visible for relevant receivers. Ultimately, receivers equipped with different perception than ours may impose selection to morphs hidden from human sight.en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell
dc.relation.ispartofseriesJournal of Evolutionary Biology
dc.rightsCC BY 4.0
dc.subject.otheraposematism
dc.subject.otherArctia plantaginis
dc.subject.otherdiscriminant analysis
dc.subject.othermultispectral imaging
dc.subject.otherpolymorphism
dc.subject.otherwood tiger moth
dc.titleGenetic colour variation visible for predators and conspecifics is concealed from humans in a polymorphic moth
dc.typearticle
dc.identifier.urnURN:NBN:fi:jyu-202203151835
dc.contributor.laitosBio- ja ympäristötieteiden laitosfi
dc.contributor.laitosDepartment of Biological and Environmental Scienceen
dc.contributor.oppiaineEkologia ja evoluutiobiologiafi
dc.contributor.oppiaineEvoluutiotutkimus (huippuyksikkö)fi
dc.contributor.oppiaineEcology and Evolutionary Biologyen
dc.contributor.oppiaineCentre of Excellence in Evolutionary Researchen
dc.type.urihttp://purl.org/eprint/type/JournalArticle
dc.description.reviewstatuspeerReviewed
dc.format.pagerange467-478
dc.relation.issn1010-061X
dc.relation.numberinseries3
dc.relation.volume35
dc.type.versionpublishedVersion
dc.rights.copyright© 2022 The Authors. Journal of Evolutionary Biology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of European Society for Evolutionary Biology
dc.rights.accesslevelopenAccessfi
dc.relation.grantnumber320438
dc.subject.ysogenotyyppi
dc.subject.ysohavainnointi
dc.subject.ysofenotyyppi
dc.subject.ysomuuntelu (biologia)
dc.subject.ysovaroitusväri
dc.subject.ysotäpläsiilikäs
dc.format.contentfulltext
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p8863
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p8802
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p13074
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p8280
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p27907
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p27473
dc.rights.urlhttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.relation.datasethttp://urn.fi/URN:NBN:fi:jyu-202202171535
dc.relation.doi10.1111/jeb.13994
dc.relation.funderSuomen Akatemiafi
dc.relation.funderAcademy of Finlanden
jyx.fundingprogramAkatemiaprofessorin tutkimuskulut, SAfi
jyx.fundingprogramResearch costs of Academy Professor, AoFen
jyx.fundinginformationThis work was supported by the Academy of Finland to JM (#320438) and the grant (#21000038821) to ON.
datacite.isSupplementedBy.doi10.17011/jyx/dataset/79808
datacite.isSupplementedByNokelainen, Ossi; Galarza Pavia, Juan; Kirvesoja, Jimi; Suisto, Kaisa; Mappes, Johanna (2022). Supplementary data to: Genetic colour variation visible for predators and conspecifics is concealed from humans in a polymorphic moth. https://doi.org/10.17011/jyx/dataset/79808. <a href="http://urn.fi/URN:NBN:fi:jyu-202202171535">https://urn.fi/URN:NBN:fi:jyu-202202171535</a>


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