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dc.contributor.authorGray, Ross E., J.
dc.contributor.authorRodriguez, Luisa, F.
dc.contributor.authorLewis, Owen, T.
dc.contributor.authorChung, Arthur Y., C.
dc.contributor.authorOvaskainen, Otso
dc.contributor.authorSlade, Eleanor, M.
dc.date.accessioned2021-10-13T07:32:28Z
dc.date.available2021-10-13T07:32:28Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.citationGray, R. E., Rodriguez, L., Lewis, O., Chung, A. Y., Ovaskainen, O., & Slade, E. (2021). Movement of forest‐dependent dung beetles through riparian buffers in Bornean oil palm plantations. <i>Journal of Applied Ecology</i>, <i>Early online</i>. <a href="https://doi.org/10.1111/1365-2664.14049" target="_blank">https://doi.org/10.1111/1365-2664.14049</a>
dc.identifier.otherCONVID_101409682
dc.identifier.urihttps://jyx.jyu.fi/handle/123456789/78204
dc.description.abstract1.Fragmentation of tropical forests is increasing globally, with negative impacts for biodiversity. In Southeast Asia, expansion of oil palm agriculture has caused widespread deforestation, forest degradation, and fragmentation. 2.Persistence of forest-dependent species within these fragmented landscapes is likely to depend on the capacity of individuals to move between forest patches. In oil palm landscapes, riparian buffers along streams and rivers are potential movement corridors, but their use by moving animals is poorly studied. 3.We examined how six dung beetle species traversed riparian buffers connected to a continuous forest reserve area within an oil palm plantation in Sabah, Malaysian Borneo. We used a mark-release-recapture study and a new Bayesian Joint Species Movement Modelling (JSMM) approach, extended to a continuous capture process model. 4.Dung beetle species were fairly generalist in their habitat use, but two species showed a statistically-supported preference for riparian buffer forest over oil palm, and one species showed a strong preference for forest reserve over riparian buffer, indicating the importance of forested areas within oil palm landscapes for some species. 5.A land-use change simulation indicated that the loss of riparian buffers in oil palm will result in reduced movement by forest-dependent species. 6.Synthesis and applications: Our results provide evidence for the use of riparian buffers in oil palm plantations for forest-dependent dung beetle species, strengthening the case for their retention, restoration, and re-establishment. Furthermore, our study demonstrates the wider applicability of the Joint Species Movement Modelling (JSMM) framework to assess movement behaviour of species in fragmented landscapes, a vital tool for future forest and landscape management and conservation prioritisation exercises.en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherWiley
dc.relation.ispartofseriesJournal of Applied Ecology
dc.rightsIn Copyright
dc.subject.otherBayesian joint species movement modelling
dc.subject.otherdispersal
dc.subject.otherinsects
dc.subject.othermark-release-recapture
dc.subject.otherMalaysia
dc.subject.othermovement corridor
dc.subject.otherriparian reserves
dc.subject.othertropical forest
dc.titleMovement of forest‐dependent dung beetles through riparian buffers in Bornean oil palm plantations
dc.typearticle
dc.identifier.urnURN:NBN:fi:jyu-202110135237
dc.contributor.laitosBio- ja ympäristötieteiden laitosfi
dc.contributor.laitosDepartment of Biological and Environmental Scienceen
dc.type.urihttp://purl.org/eprint/type/JournalArticle
dc.description.reviewstatuspeerReviewed
dc.relation.issn0021-8901
dc.relation.volumeEarly online
dc.type.versionacceptedVersion
dc.rights.copyright© 2021 John Wiley & Sons
dc.rights.accesslevelembargoedAccessfi
dc.relation.grantnumber856506
dc.relation.grantnumber856506
dc.relation.projectidinfo:eu-repo/grantAgreement/EC/H2020/856506/EU//LIFEPLAN
dc.subject.ysohyönteiset
dc.subject.ysobayesilainen menetelmä
dc.subject.ysoviljelymetsät
dc.subject.ysohabitaatti
dc.subject.ysolantakuoriaiset
dc.subject.ysotrooppinen vyöhyke
dc.subject.ysopuupellot
dc.subject.ysoleviäminen
dc.format.contentfulltext
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p1983
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p17803
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p19967
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p5678
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p20074
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p19322
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p23806
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p6884
dc.rights.urlhttp://rightsstatements.org/page/InC/1.0/?language=en
dc.relation.doi10.1111/1365-2664.14049
dc.relation.funderEuroopan komissiofi
dc.relation.funderEuropean Commissionen
jyx.fundingprogramERC European Research Council, H2020fi
jyx.fundingprogramERC European Research Council, H2020en
jyx.fundinginformationREJG, EMS and OTL were supported by Natural Environment Research Council Grant NE/K016261/1 as part of the Human Modified Tropical Forests programme. EMS is supported by an MOE AcRF Tier 1 (Grant No: RG119/19). The analysis by LF was supported by a PhD fellowship from Helsinki University and a fellowship from EDUFI. OO was funded by Academy of Finland (Grant No: 309581), Jane and Aatos Erkko Foundation, Research Council of Norway through its Centres of Excellence Funding Scheme (223257), and the European Research Council (ERC) under the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme (Grant Agreement No: 856506; ERC-synergy project LIFEPLAN).


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