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dc.contributor.authorHämäläinen, Liisa
dc.contributor.authorHoppitt, William
dc.contributor.authorRowland, Hannah M.
dc.contributor.authorMappes, Johanna
dc.contributor.authorFulford, Anthony J.
dc.contributor.authorSosa, Sebastian
dc.contributor.authorThorogood, Rose
dc.date.accessioned2021-07-02T11:05:38Z
dc.date.available2021-07-02T11:05:38Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.citationHämäläinen, L., Hoppitt, W., Rowland, H. M., Mappes, J., Fulford, A. J., Sosa, S., & Thorogood, R. (2021). Social transmission in the wild can reduce predation pressure on novel prey signals. <i>Nature Communications</i>, <i>12</i>, Article 3978. <a href="https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-021-24154-0" target="_blank">https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-021-24154-0</a>
dc.identifier.otherCONVID_98408126
dc.identifier.urihttps://jyx.jyu.fi/handle/123456789/76978
dc.description.abstractSocial transmission of information is taxonomically widespread and could have profound effects on the ecological and evolutionary dynamics of animal communities. Demonstrating this in the wild, however, has been challenging. Here we show by field experiment that social transmission among predators can shape how selection acts on prey defences. Using artificial prey and a novel approach in statistical analyses of social networks, we find that blue tit (Cyanistes caeruleus) and great tit (Parus major) predators learn about prey defences by watching others. This shifts population preferences rapidly to match changes in prey profitability, and reduces predation pressure from naïve predators. Our results may help resolve how costly prey defences are maintained despite influxes of naïve juvenile predators, and suggest that accounting for social transmission is essential if we are to understand coevolutionary processes.en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherNature Publishing Group
dc.relation.ispartofseriesNature Communications
dc.rightsCC BY 4.0
dc.subject.otherbehavioural ecology
dc.subject.othercoevolution
dc.subject.othercultural evolution
dc.subject.otherevolutionary ecology
dc.titleSocial transmission in the wild can reduce predation pressure on novel prey signals
dc.typearticle
dc.identifier.urnURN:NBN:fi:jyu-202107024165
dc.contributor.laitosBio- ja ympäristötieteiden laitosfi
dc.contributor.laitosDepartment of Biological and Environmental Scienceen
dc.type.urihttp://purl.org/eprint/type/JournalArticle
dc.description.reviewstatuspeerReviewed
dc.relation.issn2041-1723
dc.relation.volume12
dc.type.versionpublishedVersion
dc.rights.copyright© The Author(s) 2021
dc.rights.accesslevelopenAccessfi
dc.relation.grantnumber284666
dc.subject.ysoevoluutioekologia
dc.subject.ysotalitiainen
dc.subject.ysosinitiainen
dc.subject.ysoeläinten käyttäytyminen
dc.subject.ysosaalistus
dc.subject.ysososiaalinen oppiminen
dc.subject.ysokulttuurievoluutio
dc.format.contentfulltext
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p16528
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p12931
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p12446
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p18481
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p946
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p16193
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p8279
dc.rights.urlhttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.relation.doi10.1038/s41467-021-24154-0
dc.relation.funderSuomen Akatemiafi
dc.relation.funderAcademy of Finlanden
jyx.fundingprogramHuippuyksikkörahoitus, SAfi
jyx.fundingprogramCentre of Excellence, AoFen
jyx.fundinginformationL.H. was funded by the Finnish Cultural Foundation and Emil Aaltonen Foundation and is currently supported by Jenny and Antti Wihuri Foundation. H.M.R. was supported by a research grant from the Royal Society (RG110122), an early career project grant from the British Ecological Society (ECPG 3569/4373), a research fellowship from the Institute of Zoology London, and is currently supported by the Max Planck Society. J.M. was supported by the Academy of Finland (#284666) and the University of Jyväskylä. R.T. was supported by an Independent Research Fellowship from the Natural Environment Research Council UK (NE/K00929X/1) and a start-up grant from the Helsinki Institute of Life Science (HiLIFE), University of Helsinki.


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