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dc.contributor.authorKari, Jaana T.
dc.contributor.authorPehkonen, Jaakko
dc.contributor.authorTammelin, Tuija H.
dc.contributor.authorHutri‐Kähönen, Nina
dc.contributor.authorRaitakari. Olli T.
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-24T09:15:59Z
dc.date.available2020-09-24T09:15:59Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.citationKari, Jaana T., Pehkonen, Jaakko, Tammelin, Tuija H., Hutri‐Kähönen, Nina, Raitakari. Olli T. (2021). Childhood physical activity as a labor market investment. <i>Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports</i>, <i>31</i>(1), 163-183. <a href="https://doi.org/10.1111/sms.13829" target="_blank">https://doi.org/10.1111/sms.13829</a>
dc.identifier.otherCONVID_42149684
dc.identifier.urihttps://jyx.jyu.fi/handle/123456789/71865
dc.description.abstractThis study examined the role of physical activity and changes in physical activity levels during childhood in long‐term labor market outcomes. To address this important but under‐researched theme, the study utilized data drawn from longitudinal research, the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study (YFS), and from registries compiled by Statistics Finland. The study consisted of children aged 9 (n=1565) and 15 (n=2445) at the time their physical activity was measured. Labor market outcomes, including employment status, average employment months, and average unemployment months, were calculated from 1997 to 2010, when the participants were aged 20 to 48 years. Regression models were used to assess the relationship between physical activity and labor market outcomes. The results show that the consequences of childhood physical activity may be far‐reaching, as higher childhood physical activity was positively related to the probability of being employed and employment months and was negatively related to unemployment months. On average, a one‐unit increase in physical activity index was related to a 1% higher probability of being employed, 0.10 more months of yearly employment, and 0.05 fewer months of yearly unemployment. The results also imply that persistently active individuals had the highest level of employment and the lowest level of unemployment compared with other activity groups. In conclusion, investments in childhood physical activity may not only promote health and well‐being but may also correlate with better labor market outcomes later in life, providing both personal and societal benefits.en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageeng
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherWiley
dc.relation.ispartofseriesScandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports
dc.rightsIn Copyright
dc.subject.otherphysical activity
dc.subject.otheremployment
dc.subject.otherunemployment
dc.subject.otherregister-based data
dc.titleChildhood physical activity as a labor market investment
dc.typearticle
dc.identifier.urnURN:NBN:fi:jyu-202009245946
dc.contributor.laitosKauppakorkeakoulufi
dc.contributor.laitosSchool of Business and Economicsen
dc.contributor.oppiaineTaloustiedefi
dc.contributor.oppiaineEmpirical Microeconomicsfi
dc.contributor.oppiainePolitiikkarelevantti taloustiede (painoala)fi
dc.contributor.oppiaineBasic or discovery scholarshipfi
dc.contributor.oppiaineEconomicsen
dc.contributor.oppiaineEmpirical Microeconomicsen
dc.contributor.oppiainePolicy-Relevant Economics (focus area)en
dc.contributor.oppiaineBasic or discovery scholarshipen
dc.type.urihttp://purl.org/eprint/type/JournalArticle
dc.description.reviewstatuspeerReviewed
dc.format.pagerange163-183
dc.relation.issn0905-7188
dc.relation.numberinseries1
dc.relation.volume31
dc.type.versionacceptedVersion
dc.rights.copyright© 2020 John Wiley & Sons A/S
dc.rights.accesslevelopenAccessfi
dc.subject.ysotyöllistyminen
dc.subject.ysolapsuus
dc.subject.ysoseurantatutkimus
dc.subject.ysotyöttömyys
dc.subject.ysopitkittäistutkimus
dc.subject.ysofyysinen aktiivisuus
dc.subject.ysoliikunta
dc.subject.ysotyömarkkina-asema
dc.format.contentfulltext
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p3542
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p13735
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p13719
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p11571
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p14610
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p23102
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p916
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p23554
dc.rights.urlhttp://rightsstatements.org/page/InC/1.0/?language=en
dc.relation.doi10.1111/sms.13829
jyx.fundinginformationThis study was supported by the Finnish Ministry of Education and Culture, Juho Vainio Foundation, Yrjö Jahnsson Foundation (grants 6648, 6914, 6915), the Academy of Finland (grant 273971), and OP Group Research Foundation. The Young Finns Study has been financially supported by the Academy of Finland: grant numbers 322098, 286284, 134309 (Eye), 126925, 121584, 124282, 129378 (Salve), 117787 (Gendi), and 41071 (Skidi); the Social Insurance Institution of Finland; Competitive State Research Financing of the Expert Responsibility area of Kuopio; Tampere and Turku University Hospitals (grant number X51001); Juho Vainio Foundation; Paavo Nurmi Foundation; Finnish Foundation for Cardiovascular Research; Finnish Cultural Foundation; the Sigrid Juselius Foundation; Tampere Tuberculosis Foundation; Emil Aaltonen Foundation; Yrjö Jahnsson Foundation; Signe and Ane Gyllenberg Foundation; Jenny and Antti Wihuri Foundation; Diabetes Research Foundation of Finnish Diabetes Association; EU Horizon 2020 (grant number 755320 for TAX-INOMISIS); European Research Council (grant number 742927 for MULTIEPIGEN project); and Tampere University Hospital Supporting Foundation.


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