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dc.contributor.authorMason, Joel
dc.contributor.authorFrazer, Ashlyn K.
dc.contributor.authorJaberzadeh, Shapour
dc.contributor.authorAhtiainen, Juha P.
dc.contributor.authorAvela, Janne
dc.contributor.authorRantalainen, Timo
dc.contributor.authorLeung, Michael
dc.contributor.authorKidgell, Dawson J.
dc.date.accessioned2020-01-21T13:28:42Z
dc.date.available2020-01-21T13:28:42Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.citationMason, J., Frazer, A. K., Jaberzadeh, S., Ahtiainen, J. P., Avela, J., Rantalainen, T., Leung, M., & Kidgell, D. J. (2019). Determining the Corticospinal Responses to Single Bouts of Skill and Strength Training. <i>Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research</i>, <i>33</i>(9), 2299-2307. <a href="https://doi.org/10.1519/JSC.0000000000003266" target="_blank">https://doi.org/10.1519/JSC.0000000000003266</a>
dc.identifier.otherCONVID_32176486
dc.identifier.urihttps://jyx.jyu.fi/handle/123456789/67438
dc.description.abstractNeuroplastic changes in the primary motor cortex accompany performance improvements following motor practice. Recent evidence suggests that the corticospinal responses to strength and skill training are similar, following both a single session and repeated bouts of training, promoting discussion that strength training is a form of motor learning. However, these findings are limited by the lack of a light-load strength training group. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to determine whether a single session of heavy-load strength training, light-load strength training or skill training differentially modulates the corticospinal pathway. Transcranial magnetic stimulation was used to assess the excitatory and inhibitory circuitry of the motor cortex following a single session of skill training, and following a single session of light-load and heavy-load strength training. Following a single session of training, participants in all groups experienced comparable increases in corticospinal excitability (ranging from 38 to 46%, all p < 0.05); however, disparity was observed in the inhibitory responses. Corticospinal inhibition was reduced in all 3 single-sessions, although to a greater magnitude in the heavy-load and skill-training sessions (22 and 18% respectively, compared with 11% following light-load training, all p < 0.05). Short-interval intracortical inhibition was reduced immediately following single sessions of heavy-load strength training (40% p < 0.05) and skill training (47% p < 0.05), but remained unchanged the following light-load strength training session. It appears that the corticospinal responses to single sessions of different types of strength and skill training are task-dependent. These findings reinforce the notion that strength training, at least when heavily-loaded, can be considered a form of motor learning, potentially because of the sensory feedback involved.en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageeng
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins
dc.relation.ispartofseriesJournal of Strength and Conditioning Research
dc.rightsIn Copyright
dc.subject.otherkortikospinaalirata
dc.subject.othercorticospinal excitability
dc.subject.othercorticospinal silent period
dc.subject.otherintracortical inhibition
dc.subject.otherneuroplasticity
dc.subject.otherskill training
dc.subject.otherstrength exercise
dc.titleDetermining the Corticospinal Responses to Single Bouts of Skill and Strength Training
dc.typearticle
dc.identifier.urnURN:NBN:fi:jyu-202001211391
dc.contributor.laitosLiikuntatieteellinen tiedekuntafi
dc.contributor.laitosFaculty of Sport and Health Sciencesen
dc.contributor.oppiaineValmennus- ja testausoppifi
dc.contributor.oppiaineBiomekaniikkafi
dc.contributor.oppiaineScience of Sport Coaching and Fitness Testingen
dc.contributor.oppiaineBiomechanicsen
dc.type.urihttp://purl.org/eprint/type/JournalArticle
dc.description.reviewstatuspeerReviewed
dc.format.pagerange2299-2307
dc.relation.issn1064-8011
dc.relation.numberinseries9
dc.relation.volume33
dc.type.versionacceptedVersion
dc.rights.copyright© 2019 National Strength and Conditioning Association
dc.rights.accesslevelopenAccessfi
dc.subject.ysoharjoittelu
dc.subject.ysotaidot
dc.subject.ysoliikunta
dc.subject.ysovoimaharjoittelu
dc.format.contentfulltext
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p26412
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p5798
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p916
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p16233
dc.rights.urlhttp://rightsstatements.org/page/InC/1.0/?language=en
dc.relation.doi10.1519/JSC.0000000000003266
jyx.fundinginformationThis research did not receive any specific grant from funding agencies in the public, commercial, or not-for-profit sectors.


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