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dc.contributor.authorTaipale, Sami J.
dc.contributor.authorAalto, Sanni L.
dc.contributor.authorGalloway, Aaron W. E.
dc.contributor.authorKuoppamäki, Kirsi
dc.contributor.authorNzobeuh, Polain
dc.contributor.authorPeltomaa, Elina
dc.date.accessioned2019-12-16T10:57:46Z
dc.date.available2019-12-16T10:57:46Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.citationTaipale, S. J., Aalto, S. L., Galloway, A. W. E., Kuoppamäki, K., Nzobeuh, P., & Peltomaa, E. (2019). Eutrophication and browning influence Daphnia nutritional ecology. <i>Inland Waters</i>, <i>9</i>(3), 374-394. <a href="https://doi.org/10.1080/20442041.2019.1574177" target="_blank">https://doi.org/10.1080/20442041.2019.1574177</a>
dc.identifier.otherCONVID_31946615
dc.identifier.urihttps://jyx.jyu.fi/handle/123456789/66817
dc.description.abstractClimate change and land-use practices can enhance lake eutrophication and browning, which influence phytoplankton composition by decreasing the availability of food high in nutritional quality (algae) and increasing the abundance of low-quality food (terrestrial detritus, bacteria) for herbivorous zooplankton. Nutritionally valuable algae for zooplankton are rich in essential biomolecules such as amino acids, polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), sterols, and phosphorus. We performed laboratory experiments and showed a stronger positive relationship between zooplankton (Daphnia) cumulative offspring number and availability of high-quality algae (Cryptophytes: Rhodomonas/Cryptomonas; and Chrysophytes: Mallomonas) than with intermediate-quality (Chlorophytes: Acutodesmus) or poor-quality (Dinoflagellates: Peridinium) algae. The higher cumulative offspring number of Daphnia was a result of higher amounts of total ω-3 and ω-6 PUFA, proteins, sterols, and amino acids in the algal diets. The experiments also showed that even a small addition of high-quality algae (Rhodomonas) to intermediate-quality (Acutodesmus) or low-quality (bacteria, heterotrophic nanoflagellates, or terrestrial organic matter) diets can enhance the Daphnia cumulative offspring production. Our carbon mass balance calculation for a eutrophic clearwater lake and an oligotrophic polyhumic lake showed that the abundance of high-quality phytoplankton (cryptophytes, chrysophytes, diatoms) among total particulate organic carbon was minor (8.7% [SD 2.4%] and 6.5% [7.0%]). We modeled Daphnia diets (i.e., resource assimilation) using a fatty acid mixing model. Our analyses showed that Daphnia were able to locate high-quality algae (cryptophytes, chrysophytes, and diatoms) more effectively during cyanobacteria blooms in a eutrophic lake (55% [SD 12%]) than in a polyhumic lake (25% [10%]). Nevertheless, our results show that intense eutrophication and browning diminish assimilation of high quality algae, limiting Daphnia biomass production.en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageeng
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTaylor & Francis
dc.relation.ispartofseriesInland Waters
dc.rightsIn Copyright
dc.subject.otheramino acids
dc.subject.otherbacteria
dc.subject.otherfatty acids
dc.subject.otherheteronanoflagellates
dc.subject.otherphytoplankton
dc.subject.otherpolyunsaturated sterols
dc.subject.otherzooplankton
dc.titleEutrophication and browning influence Daphnia nutritional ecology
dc.typearticle
dc.identifier.urnURN:NBN:fi:jyu-201912165310
dc.contributor.laitosBio- ja ympäristötieteiden laitosfi
dc.contributor.laitosDepartment of Biological and Environmental Scienceen
dc.contributor.oppiaineAkvaattiset tieteetfi
dc.contributor.oppiaineAquatic Sciencesen
dc.type.urihttp://purl.org/eprint/type/JournalArticle
dc.description.reviewstatuspeerReviewed
dc.format.pagerange374-394
dc.relation.issn2044-2041
dc.relation.numberinseries3
dc.relation.volume9
dc.type.versionacceptedVersion
dc.rights.copyright© 2019 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group
dc.rights.accesslevelopenAccessfi
dc.subject.ysoaminohapot
dc.subject.ysorasvahapot
dc.subject.ysoplankton
dc.subject.ysobakteerit
dc.format.contentfulltext
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p9530
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p4800
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p3053
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p1749
dc.rights.urlhttp://rightsstatements.org/page/InC/1.0/?language=en
dc.relation.doi10.1080/20442041.2019.1574177
jyx.fundinginformationThis research was supported by Academy of Finland research grant 251665 awarded to SJT, 276268 to EP, and 310302 to SLA. AWEG was supported by startup funding from the University of Oregon.


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