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dc.contributor.authorKoivunen, Kaisa
dc.contributor.authorSillanpää, Elina
dc.contributor.authorvon Bonsdorff, Mikaela
dc.contributor.authorSakari, Ritva
dc.contributor.authorTörmäkangas, Timo
dc.contributor.authorRantanen, Taina
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-30T14:05:23Z
dc.date.available2019-10-30T14:05:23Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.citationKoivunen, K., Sillanpää, E., von Bonsdorff, M., Sakari, R., Törmäkangas, T., & Rantanen, T. (2020). Mortality Risk among Older People Who Did Versus Did Not Sustain a Fracture : Baseline Prefracture Strength and Gait Speed as Predictors in a 15-Year Follow-Up. <i>Journals of Gerontology Series A : Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences</i>, <i>75</i>(10), 1996-2002. <a href="https://doi.org/10.1093/gerona/glz251" target="_blank">https://doi.org/10.1093/gerona/glz251</a>
dc.identifier.otherCONVID_33315912
dc.identifier.urihttps://jyx.jyu.fi/handle/123456789/66116
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Physiological reserve, as indicated by muscle strength and gait speed, may be especially determinant of survival in people who are exposed to a health stressor. We studied whether the association between strength/speed and mortality risk would be stronger in the time period after a fracture compared to other time periods. METHODS: Participants were population-based sample of 157 men and 325 women aged 75 and 80 years at baseline. Maximal 10-meter gait speed and maximal isometric grip and knee extension strength were tested at the baseline before the fracture. Subsequent fracture incidence and mortality were followed up for 15 years. Cox regression analysis was used to estimate fracture time-stratified effects of gait speed and muscle strength on mortality risk in three states: 1) non-fracture state, 2) the first post-fracture year and 3) after the first post-fracture year until death/end of follow-up. RESULTS: During the follow-up, 20% of the men and 44% of the women sustained a fracture. In both sexes, lower gait speed and in women lower knee extension strength was associated with increased mortality risk in the non-fracture state. During the first post-fracture year, the mortality risk associated with slower gait and lower strength was increased and higher than in the non-fracture state. After the first post-fracture year, mortality risk associated with lower gait speed and muscle strength attenuated. CONCLUSIONS: Lower gait speed and muscle strength were more strongly associated with mortality risk after fracture than during non-fracture time, which may indicate decreased likelihood of recovery.en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageeng
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherOxford University Press; The Gerontological Society of America
dc.relation.ispartofseriesJournals of Gerontology Series A : Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences
dc.rightsIn Copyright
dc.subject.otheradverse events
dc.subject.otherepidemiology
dc.subject.otherfracture
dc.subject.otherhealth stressors
dc.subject.otherphysical function
dc.titleMortality Risk among Older People Who Did Versus Did Not Sustain a Fracture : Baseline Prefracture Strength and Gait Speed as Predictors in a 15-Year Follow-Up
dc.typearticle
dc.identifier.urnURN:NBN:fi:jyu-201910304683
dc.contributor.laitosLiikuntatieteellinen tiedekuntafi
dc.contributor.laitosFaculty of Sport and Health Sciencesen
dc.contributor.oppiaineGerontologia ja kansanterveysfi
dc.contributor.oppiaineFysioterapiafi
dc.contributor.oppiaineGerontology and Public Healthen
dc.contributor.oppiainePhysiotherapyen
dc.type.urihttp://purl.org/eprint/type/JournalArticle
dc.description.reviewstatuspeerReviewed
dc.format.pagerange1996-2002
dc.relation.issn1079-5006
dc.relation.numberinseries10
dc.relation.volume75
dc.type.versionacceptedVersion
dc.rights.copyright© The Author(s) 2019
dc.rights.accesslevelopenAccessfi
dc.relation.grantnumber693045
dc.relation.grantnumber693045
dc.relation.grantnumber310526
dc.relation.projectidinfo:eu-repo/grantAgreement/EC/H2020/693045/EU//AGNES
dc.subject.ysoepidemiologia
dc.subject.ysokuolleisuus
dc.subject.ysoluunmurtumat
dc.subject.ysoikääntyneet
dc.subject.ysofyysinen toimintakyky
dc.subject.ysovanhukset
dc.format.contentfulltext
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p11307
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p5003
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p23619
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p2433
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p27172
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p2434
dc.rights.urlhttp://rightsstatements.org/page/InC/1.0/?language=en
dc.relation.doi10.1093/gerona/glz251
dc.relation.funderEuroopan komissiofi
dc.relation.funderSuomen Akatemiafi
dc.relation.funderEuropean Commissionen
dc.relation.funderAcademy of Finlanden
jyx.fundingprogramERC European Research Council, H2020fi
jyx.fundingprogramAkatemiahanke, SAfi
jyx.fundingprogramERC European Research Council, H2020en
jyx.fundingprogramAcademy Project, AoFen
jyx.fundinginformationThis work was supported by the Academy of Finland (grant number 310526 to T.R.) and the European Research Council (grant number 693045 to T.R.). The Evergreen 1 project has been supported by the Academy of Finland, Finnish Social Insurance Institution, Finnish Ministry of Education, Finnish Ministry of Social Affairs and Health, City of Jyväskylä, and the Association of Finnish Lion Clubs and the Scandinavian Red Feather Project. The financial sponsors were not involved in the design, implementation, analyses, or reporting of the results.


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