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dc.contributor.authorParhiala, P.
dc.contributor.authorRanta, K.
dc.contributor.authorGergov, V.
dc.contributor.authorKontunen, J.
dc.contributor.authorLaw, R.
dc.contributor.authorLa Greca, A. M.
dc.contributor.authorTorppa, M.
dc.contributor.authorMarttunen, M.
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-30T13:05:57Z
dc.date.available2019-10-30T13:05:57Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.citationParhiala, P.; Ranta, K.; Gergov, V.; Kontunen, J.; Law, R.; La Greca, A. M.; Torppa, M.; Marttunen, M. (2020). Interpersonal Counseling in the Treatment of Adolescent Depression : A Randomized Controlled Effectiveness and Feasibility Study in School Health and Welfare Services. School Mental Health, 12 (2), 265-283. DOI: 10.1007/s12310-019-09346-w
dc.identifier.otherCONVID_33343149
dc.identifier.urihttps://jyx.jyu.fi/handle/123456789/66112
dc.description.abstractIn order to offer early and accessible treatment for adolescents with depression, brief and effective treatments in adolescents’ everyday surroundings are needed. This randomized controlled trial studied the preliminary effectiveness, feasibility, and acceptability of interpersonal counseling (IPC) and brief psychosocial support (BPS) in school health and welfare services. The study was conducted in the 28 lower secondary schools of a large city in Southern Finland, randomized to provide either IPC or BPS. Help-seeking 12–16-year-old adolescents with mild-to-moderate depression, with and without comorbid anxiety, were included in the study. Fifty-five adolescents received either 6 weekly sessions of IPC or BPS and two follow-up sessions. Outcome measures included self- and clinician-rated measures of depression, global functioning, and psychological distress/well-being. To assess feasibility and acceptability of the treatments, adolescents’ and counselors’ treatment compliance and satisfaction with treatment were assessed. Both treatments were effective in reducing depressive disorders and improving adolescents’ overall functioning and well-being. At post-treatment, in both groups, over 50% of adolescents achieved recovery based on self-report and over 70% based on observer report. Effect sizes for change were medium or large in both groups at post-treatment and increased at 6-month follow-up. A trend indicating greater baseline symptom severity among adolescents treated in the IPC-providing schools was observed. Adolescents and counselors in both groups were satisfied with the treatment, and 89% of the adolescents completed the treatments and follow-ups. This trial suggests that both IPC and BPS are feasible, acceptable, and effective treatments for mild-to-moderate depression in the school setting. In addition, IPC seems effective even if comorbid anxiety exists. Our study shows that brief, structured interventions, such as IPC and BPS, are beneficial in treating mild-to-moderate depression in school settings and can be administered by professionals working at school.en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageeng
dc.publisherSpringer New York LLC
dc.relation.ispartofseriesSchool Mental Health
dc.rightsCC BY 4.0
dc.subject.otheradolescents
dc.subject.otherdepression
dc.subject.otherinterpersonal counseling
dc.subject.otherbrief treatment
dc.subject.otherschool health and welfare services
dc.titleInterpersonal Counseling in the Treatment of Adolescent Depression : A Randomized Controlled Effectiveness and Feasibility Study in School Health and Welfare Services
dc.typearticle
dc.identifier.urnURN:NBN:fi:jyu-201910304679
dc.contributor.laitosOpettajankoulutuslaitosfi
dc.contributor.laitosPsykologian laitosfi
dc.contributor.laitosDepartment of Teacher Educationen
dc.contributor.laitosDepartment of Psychologyen
dc.type.urihttp://purl.org/eprint/type/JournalArticle
dc.description.reviewstatuspeerReviewed
dc.format.pagerange265-283
dc.relation.issn1866-2625
dc.relation.numberinseries2
dc.relation.volume12
dc.type.versionpublishedVersion
dc.rights.copyright© The Author(s) 2019
dc.rights.accesslevelopenAccessfi
dc.relation.grantnumber276239
dc.subject.ysolyhytterapia
dc.subject.ysohenkilökohtainen apu
dc.subject.ysonuoret
dc.subject.ysomasennus
dc.subject.ysokouluterveydenhuolto
dc.format.contentfulltext
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p6775
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p24239
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p11617
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p7995
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p11770
dc.rights.urlhttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.relation.doi10.1007/s12310-019-09346-w
dc.relation.funderSuomen Akatemiafi
dc.relation.funderAcademy of Finlanden
jyx.fundingprogramAkatemiatutkijan tehtävä, SAfi
jyx.fundingprogramResearch post as Academy Research Fellow, AoFen
jyx.fundinginformationThis study was funded by the Finnish Government, Grant VNK/400/48/2015, by Academy of Finland (Grant #2762392), and by Jenny and Antti Wihuri Foundation (Grant #00170283).


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