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dc.contributor.authorBengtsson, Erik
dc.contributor.authorMissiaia, Anna
dc.contributor.authorNummela, Ilkka
dc.contributor.authorOlsson, Mats
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-23T09:49:45Z
dc.date.available2019-10-23T09:49:45Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.citationBengtsson, E., Missiaia, A., Nummela, I., & Olsson, M. (2019). Unequal poverty and equal industrialisation : Finnish wealth, 1750-1900. <i>Scandinavian Economic History Review</i>, <i>67</i>(3), 229-248. <a href="https://doi.org/10.1080/03585522.2018.1546614" target="_blank">https://doi.org/10.1080/03585522.2018.1546614</a>
dc.identifier.otherCONVID_28755922
dc.identifier.otherTUTKAID_79715
dc.identifier.urihttps://jyx.jyu.fi/handle/123456789/66008
dc.description.abstractWe present the first comprehensive, long-run estimates of Finnish wealth and its distribution from 1750 to 1900. Using wealth data from 17,279 probate inventories, we show that Finland was very unequal between 1750 and 1850; the top decile owned about 90% of total wealth. This means that Finland was more unequal than the much wealthier economies Britain, France and the US, which goes against the common assumption of richer economies being more unequal. Moreover, when industrialisation took off in Finland, inequality started a downward trajectory. High inequality 1750–1850 was bottom-driven, by a large share of the population owning nothing or close to nothing of value, while economic development after 1850 was pro-equal since the ownership of forests, since long in the hands of the peasantry, became more valuable with the development of forest-based industries. Our findings thus contradict commonplace assumptions that economic growth and industrialisation are associated with more inequality, as well as recent arguments that very few factors beyond catastrophes can decrease inequality. We instead argue for a more inductive and open approach to the determinants of long-run inequality.fi
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherScandinavian Society for Economic and Social History and Historical Geography
dc.relation.ispartofseriesScandinavian Economic History Review
dc.rightsCC BY 4.0
dc.subject.otherepätasa-arvo
dc.subject.otherSuomi
dc.subject.otherFinland
dc.subject.otherprobate inventories
dc.titleUnequal poverty and equal industrialisation : Finnish wealth, 1750-1900
dc.typearticle
dc.identifier.urnURN:NBN:fi:jyu-201910234572
dc.contributor.laitosHistorian ja etnologian laitosfi
dc.contributor.laitosDepartment of History and Ethnologyen
dc.contributor.oppiaineTaloushistoriafi
dc.contributor.oppiaineEconomic Historyen
dc.type.urihttp://purl.org/eprint/type/JournalArticle
dc.date.updated2019-10-23T06:15:17Z
dc.description.reviewstatuspeerReviewed
dc.format.pagerange229-248
dc.relation.issn0358-5522
dc.relation.numberinseries3
dc.relation.volume67
dc.type.versionpublishedVersion
dc.rights.copyright© 2018 The Author(s)
dc.rights.accesslevelopenAccessfi
dc.subject.ysovarallisuus
dc.subject.ysoperukirjat
dc.subject.ysososiaalinen rakenne
dc.subject.ysoeriarvoisuus
dc.format.contentfulltext
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p3901
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p10565
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p4495
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p3478
dc.rights.urlhttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.relation.doi10.1080/03585522.2018.1546614
jyx.fundinginformationWork on the paper has been supported by the grants ‘Growth and inequality before the industrial revolution, Scania 1650 to 1850’, financed by the Swedish Research Council, grant 421-2012-1278, and ‘Wages, economic performance and inequality. Scandinavia in the “Little Divergence” in Europe’, financed by Handelsbankens forskningsstiftelser, grant P2014-0070:1.


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