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dc.contributor.authorWalker, Simon
dc.contributor.authorAvela, Janne
dc.contributor.authorWikgren, Jan
dc.contributor.authorMeeusen, Romain
dc.contributor.authorPiitulainen, Harri
dc.contributor.authorBaker, Stuart
dc.contributor.authorParviainen, Tiina
dc.date.accessioned2019-03-08T07:07:39Z
dc.date.available2019-03-08T07:07:39Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.citationWalker, S., Avela, J., Wikgren, J., Meeusen, R., Piitulainen, H., Baker, S., & Parviainen, T. (2019). Aging and strength training influence knee extensor intermuscular coherence during low- and high-force isometric contractions. <i>Frontiers in Physiology</i>, <i>9</i>, Article 1933. <a href="https://doi.org/10.3389/fphys.2018.01933" target="_blank">https://doi.org/10.3389/fphys.2018.01933</a>
dc.identifier.otherCONVID_28866345
dc.identifier.otherTUTKAID_80351
dc.identifier.urihttps://jyx.jyu.fi/handle/123456789/63071
dc.description.abstractAging is associated with reduced maximum force production and force steadiness during low-force tasks, but both can be improved by training. Intermuscular coherence measures coupling between two peripheral surface electromyography (EMG) signals in the frequency domain. It is thought to represent the presence of common input to alpha-motoneurons, but the functional meaning of intermuscular coherence, particularly regarding aging and training, remain unclear. This study investigated knee extensor intermuscular coherence in previously sedentary young (18–30 years) and older (67–73 years) subjects before and after a 14-week strength training intervention. YOUNG and OLDER groups performed maximum unilateral isometric knee extensions [100% maximum voluntary contraction (MVC)], as well as force steadiness tests at 20 and 70% MVC, pre- and post-training. Intermuscular (i.e., EMG-EMG) coherence analyses were performed for all (three) contraction intensities in vastus lateralis and medialis muscles. Pre-training coefficient of force variation (i.e., force steadiness) and MVC (i.e., maximum torque) were similar between groups. Both groups improved MVC through training, but YOUNG improved more than OLDER (42 ± 27 Nm versus 18 ± 16 Nm, P = 0.022). Force steadiness did not change during 20% MVC trials in either group, but YOUNG demonstrated increased coefficient of force variation during 70% MVC trials (1.28 ± 0.46 to 1.57 ± 0.70, P = 0.01). YOUNG demonstrated greater pre-training coherence during 20% and 70% MVC trials, particularly within the 8–14 Hz (e.g., 20%: 0.105 ± 0.119 versus 0.016 ± 0.009, P = 0.001) and 16–30 Hz (20%: 0.063 ± 0.078 versus 0.012 ± 0.007, P = 0.002) bands, but not during 100% MVC trials. Strength training led to increases in intermuscular coherence within the 40–60 Hz band during 70% MVC trials in YOUNG only, while OLDER decreased within the 8–14 Hz band during 100% MVC trials. Age-related differences in intermuscular coherence were observed between young and older individuals, even when neuromuscular performance levels were similar. The functional significance of intermuscular coherence remains unclear, since coherence within different frequency bands did not explain any of the variance in the regression models for maximum strength or force steadiness during 20 and 70% MVC trials.fi
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageeng
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherFrontiers Research Foundation
dc.relation.ispartofseriesFrontiers in Physiology
dc.rightsCC BY 4.0
dc.subject.otheralpha-motoneuron
dc.subject.othermotor control
dc.subject.othervoluntary contraction
dc.subject.otherlower-limb
dc.subject.otherpiper rhythm
dc.subject.otherBeta-Band
dc.titleAging and strength training influence knee extensor intermuscular coherence during low- and high-force isometric contractions
dc.typearticle
dc.identifier.urnURN:NBN:fi:jyu-201903011682
dc.contributor.laitosLiikuntatieteellinen tiedekuntafi
dc.contributor.laitosPsykologian laitosfi
dc.contributor.laitosFaculty of Sport and Health Sciencesen
dc.contributor.laitosDepartment of Psychologyen
dc.contributor.oppiainePsykologiafi
dc.contributor.oppiaineBiomekaniikkafi
dc.contributor.oppiaineMonitieteinen aivotutkimuskeskusfi
dc.contributor.oppiainePsychologyen
dc.contributor.oppiaineBiomechanicsen
dc.contributor.oppiaineCentre for Interdisciplinary Brain Researchen
dc.type.urihttp://purl.org/eprint/type/JournalArticle
dc.date.updated2019-03-01T13:15:36Z
dc.description.reviewstatuspeerReviewed
dc.relation.issn1664-042X
dc.relation.numberinseries0
dc.relation.volume9
dc.type.versionpublishedVersion
dc.rights.copyright© 2019 Walker, Avela, Wikgren, Meeusen, Piitulainen, Baker and Parviainen.
dc.rights.accesslevelopenAccessfi
dc.relation.grantnumber287680
dc.subject.ysoreidet
dc.subject.ysomotoriikka
dc.subject.ysoikääntyminen
dc.subject.ysolihasvoima
dc.subject.ysovoimaharjoittelu
dc.format.contentfulltext
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p13755
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p496
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p5056
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p23362
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p16233
dc.rights.urlhttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.relation.doi10.3389/fphys.2018.01933
dc.relation.funderSuomen Akatemiafi
dc.relation.funderAcademy of Finlanden
jyx.fundingprogramTutkijatohtori, SAfi
jyx.fundingprogramPostdoctoral Researcher, AoFen
jyx.fundinginformationThis work was funded by a personal post-doctoral researcher grant to SW by the Academy of Finland (#287680), and grants by the Academy of Finland (#296240, #304294, and #307250), Jane and Aatos Erkko Foundation and Eemil Aaltonen Foundation to HP.


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