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dc.contributor.authorJuutilainen, Katja
dc.contributor.authorMönkkönen, Mikko
dc.contributor.authorKotiranta, Heikki
dc.contributor.authorHalme, Panu
dc.date.accessioned2016-11-18T07:32:23Z
dc.date.available2016-11-18T07:32:23Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.citationJuutilainen, K., Mönkkönen, M., Kotiranta, H., & Halme, P. (2016). The role of novel forest ecosystems in the conservation of wood-inhabiting fungi in boreal broadleaved forests. <i>Ecology and Evolution</i>, <i>6</i>(19), 6943-6954. <a href="https://doi.org/10.1002/ece3.2384" target="_blank">https://doi.org/10.1002/ece3.2384</a>
dc.identifier.otherCONVID_26315800
dc.identifier.otherTUTKAID_71722
dc.identifier.urihttps://jyx.jyu.fi/handle/123456789/51910
dc.description.abstractThe increasing human impact on the earth’s biosphere is inflicting changes at all spatial scales. As well as deterioration and fragmentation of natural biological systems, these changes also led to other, unprecedented effects and emergence of novel habitats. In boreal zone, intensive forest management has negatively impacted a multitude of deadwood-associated species. This is especially alarming given the important role wood-inhabiting fungi have in the natural decay processes. In the boreal zone, natural broad-leaved-dominated, herb-rich forests are threatened habitats which have high wood-inhabiting fungal species richness. Fungal diversity in other broadleaved forest habitat types is poorly known. Traditional wood pastures and man-made afforested fields are novel habitats that could potentially be important for wood-inhabiting fungi. This study compares species richness and fungal community composition across the aforementioned habitat types, based on data collected for wood-inhabiting fungi occupying all deadwood diameter fractions. Corticioid and polyporoid fungi were surveyed from 67 130 deadwood particles in four natural herb-rich forests, four birch-dominated wood pastures, and four birch-dominated afforested field sites in central Finland. As predicted, natural herb-rich forests were the most species-rich habitat. However, afforested fields also had considerably higher overall species richness than wood pastures. Many rare or rarely collected species were detected in each forest type. Finally, fungal community composition showed some divergence not only among the different habitat types, but also among deadwood diameter fractions. Synthesis and applications: In order to maintain biodiversity at both local and regional scales, conserving threatened natural habitat types and managing traditional landscapes is essential. Man-made secondary woody habitats could provide the necessary resources and serve as surrogate habitats for many broadleaved deadwood-associated species, and thus complement the existing conservation network of natural forests.
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd.
dc.relation.ispartofseriesEcology and Evolution
dc.subject.otherafforested fields
dc.subject.otherdeadwood
dc.subject.otherfungal communities
dc.subject.othernatural herb-rich forests
dc.subject.othernovel ecosystems
dc.subject.otherwood pastures
dc.titleThe role of novel forest ecosystems in the conservation of wood-inhabiting fungi in boreal broadleaved forests
dc.typearticle
dc.identifier.urnURN:NBN:fi:jyu-201611174647
dc.contributor.laitosBio- ja ympäristötieteiden laitosfi
dc.contributor.laitosTiedemuseofi
dc.contributor.laitosDepartment of Biological and Environmental Scienceen
dc.contributor.laitosUniversity Museumen
dc.contributor.oppiaineEkologia ja evoluutiobiologiafi
dc.contributor.oppiaineMuseofi
dc.contributor.oppiaineEcology and Evolutionary Biologyen
dc.contributor.oppiaineMuseumen
dc.type.urihttp://purl.org/eprint/type/JournalArticle
dc.date.updated2016-11-17T13:15:06Z
dc.type.coarjournal article
dc.description.reviewstatuspeerReviewed
dc.format.pagerange6943-6954
dc.relation.issn2045-7758
dc.relation.numberinseries19
dc.relation.volume6
dc.type.versionpublishedVersion
dc.rights.copyright© 2016 The Authors. Ecology and Evolution published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License.
dc.rights.accesslevelopenAccessfi
dc.subject.ysoorvakat
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p23434
dc.rights.urlhttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.relation.doi10.1002/ece3.2384


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© 2016 The Authors. Ecology and Evolution published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2016 The Authors. Ecology and Evolution published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License.