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dc.contributor.authorHyvönen, Katriina
dc.contributor.authorRantanen, Johanna
dc.contributor.authorHuhtala, Mari
dc.contributor.authorWiese, Bettina S.
dc.contributor.authorTolvanen, Asko
dc.contributor.authorFeldt, Taru
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-01T13:36:25Z
dc.date.available2016-03-01T13:36:25Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.citationHyvönen, K., Rantanen, J., Huhtala, M., Wiese, B. S., Tolvanen, A., & Feldt, T. (2015). Conflicting personal goals: a risk to occupational well-being?. <em>Journal of Managerial Psychology</em>, 30 (8), 1034-1048. <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/JMP-04-2013-0105">doi:10.1108/JMP-04-2013-0105</a>
dc.identifier.otherTUTKAID_67664
dc.identifier.urihttps://jyx.jyu.fi/handle/123456789/48979
dc.description.abstractPurpose – The purpose of this paper is to investigate the moderating role of goal conflict in the relationship between the contents of managers’ personal work goals and occupational well-being (burnout and work engagement). Eight goal categories (organization, competence, well-being, career-ending, progression, prestige, job change, and employment contract) described the contents of goals. Goal conflict reflected the degree to which a personal work goal was perceived to interfere with other life domains. Design/methodology/approach – The data were drawn from a study directed to Finnish managers in 2009 (n=806). General linear models were conducted to investigate the associations between goal content categories and occupational well-being and to test whether goal conflict moderates the relationship between goal content categories and occupational well-being. Findings – Career-ending goals related to significantly higher burnout than progression goals. Participants with organization, competence, or progression goals reported the highest goal conflict, whereas participants with well-being, career-ending, or job change goals reported lower goal conflict. Goal conflict was found to have a moderating role: in a high-goal conflict situation, participants with organizational, competence, and progression goals reported lower occupational well-being, whereas participants with job change goals reported higher occupational well-being. Originality/value – The research highlights that both the contents and appraisals (e.g. goal conflict) of personal work goals should be taken into account when investigating the relationship between personal goals and well-being at work.
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherEmerald Group Publishing Limited
dc.relation.ispartofseriesJournal of Managerial Psychology
dc.subject.otherburnout
dc.subject.othergoal conflict
dc.subject.othergoal content
dc.subject.othermanagers
dc.subject.otherpersonal work goals
dc.subject.otherwork engagement
dc.titleConflicting personal goals: a risk to occupational well-being?
dc.typearticle
dc.identifier.urnURN:NBN:fi:jyu-201603011727
dc.contributor.laitosPsykologian laitosfi
dc.contributor.laitosDepartment of Psychologyen
dc.contributor.oppiainePsykologia
dc.type.urihttp://purl.org/eprint/type/JournalArticle
dc.date.updated2016-03-01T07:15:08Z
dc.type.coarjournal article
dc.description.reviewstatuspeerReviewed
dc.format.pagerange1034-1048
dc.relation.issn0268-3946
dc.relation.volume30
dc.type.versionacceptedVersion
dc.rights.copyright© Emerald Group Publishing Limited. This is a final draft version of an article whose final and definitive form has been published by Emerald. Published in this repository with the kind permission of the publisher.
dc.rights.accesslevelopenAccessfi
dc.relation.doi10.1108/JMP-04-2013-0105


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