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dc.contributor.authorKarjalainen, Juha
dc.contributor.authorUrpanen, Olli
dc.contributor.authorKeskinen, Tapio
dc.contributor.authorHuuskonen, Hannu
dc.contributor.authorSarvala, Jouko
dc.contributor.authorValkeajärvi, Pentti
dc.contributor.authorMarjomäki, Timo
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-10T10:32:50Z
dc.date.available2016-02-10T10:32:50Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.citationKarjalainen, J., Urpanen, O., Keskinen, T., Huuskonen, H., Sarvala, J., Valkeajärvi, P., & Marjomäki, T. (2016). Phenotypic plasticity in growth and fecundity induced by strong population fluctuations affects reproductive traits of female fish. <em>Ecology and Evolution</em>, 6 (3), 779-790. <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ece3.1936">doi:10.1002/ece3.1936</a>
dc.identifier.otherTUTKAID_69015
dc.identifier.urihttps://jyx.jyu.fi/handle/123456789/48725
dc.description.abstractFish are known for their high phenotypic plasticity in life-history traits in relation to environmental variability, and this is particularly pronounced among salmonids in the Northern Hemisphere. Resource limitation leads to trade-offs in phenotypic plasticity between life-history traits related to the reproduction, growth, and survival of individual fish, which have consequences for the age and size distributions of populations, as well as their dynamics and productivity. We studied the effect of plasticity in growth and fecundity of vendace females on their reproductive traits using a series of long-term incubation experiments. The wild parental fish originated from four separate populations with markedly different densities, and hence naturally induced differences in their growth and fecundity. The energy allocation to somatic tissues and eggs prior to spawning served as a proxy for total resource availability to individual females, and its effects on offspring survival and growth were analyzed. Vendace females allocated a rather constant proportion of available energy to eggs (per body mass) despite different growth patterns depending on the total resources in the different lakes; investment into eggs thus dictated the share remaining for growth. The energy allocation to eggs per mass was higher in young than in old spawners and the egg size and the relative fecundity differed between them: Young females produced more and smaller eggs and larvae than old spawners. In contrast to earlier observations of salmonids, a shortage of maternal food resources did not increase offspring size and survival. Vendace females in sparse populations with ample resources and high growth produced larger eggs and larvae. Vendace accommodate strong population fluctuations by their high plasticity in growth and fecundity, which affect their offspring size and consequently their recruitment and productivity, and account for their persistence and resilience in the face of high fishing mortality.
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd.
dc.relation.ispartofseriesEcology and Evolution
dc.subject.otherage of maturation
dc.subject.otherCoregonids
dc.subject.otherembryonic development
dc.subject.otherfisheries
dc.subject.otherlarval development
dc.subject.othermaternal effect
dc.subject.otherstock fluctuations
dc.titlePhenotypic plasticity in growth and fecundity induced by strong population fluctuations affects reproductive traits of female fish
dc.typearticle
dc.identifier.urnURN:NBN:fi:jyu-201602101532
dc.contributor.laitosBio- ja ympäristötieteiden laitosfi
dc.contributor.laitosThe Department of Biological and Environmental Scienceen
dc.contributor.oppiaineAkvaattiset tieteet
dc.type.urihttp://purl.org/eprint/type/JournalArticle
dc.date.updated2016-02-10T10:15:05Z
dc.type.coarjournal article
dc.description.reviewstatuspeerReviewed
dc.format.pagerange779-790
dc.relation.issn2045-7758
dc.relation.volume6
dc.type.versionpublishedVersion
dc.rights.copyright© 2016 The Authors. Ecology and Evolution published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License.
dc.rights.accesslevelopenAccessfi
dc.rights.urlhttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.relation.doi10.1002/ece3.1936


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© 2016 The Authors. Ecology and Evolution published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2016 The Authors. Ecology and Evolution published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License.