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dc.contributor.authorLehmann, Philipp
dc.contributor.authorBoratynski, Zbigniew
dc.contributor.authorMappes, Tapio
dc.contributor.authorMousseau, Timothy A.
dc.contributor.authorMøller, Anders P.
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-10T08:08:24Z
dc.date.available2016-02-10T08:08:24Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.citationLehmann, P., Boratynski, Z., Mappes, T., Mousseau, T. A., & Møller, A. P. (2016). Fitness costs of increased cataract frequency and cumulative radiation dose in natural mammalian populations from Chernobyl. <em>Scientific Reports</em>, 6, 19974. <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/srep19974">doi:10.1038/srep19974</a>
dc.identifier.otherTUTKAID_69082
dc.identifier.urihttps://jyx.jyu.fi/handle/123456789/48722
dc.description.abstractA cataract is a clouding of the lens that reduces light transmission to the retina, and it decreases the visual acuity of the bearer. The prevalence of cataracts in natural populations of mammals, and their potential ecological significance, is poorly known. Cataracts have been reported to arise from high levels of oxidative stress and a major cause of oxidative stress is ionizing radiation. We investigated whether elevated frequencies of cataracts are found in eyes of bank voles Myodes glareolus collected from natural populations in areas with varying levels of background radiation in Chernobyl. We found high frequencies of cataracts in voles collected from different areas in Chernobyl. The frequency of cataracts was positively correlated with age, and in females also with the accumulated radiation dose. Furthermore, the number of offspring in female voles was negatively correlated with cataract severity. The results suggest that cataracts primarily develop as a function of ionizing background radiation, most likely as a plastic response to high levels of oxidative stress. It is therefore possible that the elevated levels of background radiation in Chernobyl affect the ecology and fitness of local mammals both directly through, for instance, reduced fertility and indirectly, through increased cataractogenesis.
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherNature Publishing Group
dc.relation.ispartofseriesScientific Reports
dc.subject.otherfitness costs
dc.subject.othercataract
dc.subject.otherradiation dose
dc.subject.otherbackground radiation
dc.subject.otherChernobyl
dc.subject.otherbank vole
dc.subject.otherMyodes glareolus
dc.titleFitness costs of increased cataract frequency and cumulative radiation dose in natural mammalian populations from Chernobyl
dc.typearticle
dc.identifier.urnURN:NBN:fi:jyu-201602091513
dc.contributor.laitosBio- ja ympäristötieteiden laitosfi
dc.contributor.laitosThe Department of Biological and Environmental Scienceen
dc.contributor.oppiaineEkologia ja evoluutiobiologia
dc.type.urihttp://purl.org/eprint/type/JournalArticle
dc.date.updated2016-02-09T10:15:10Z
dc.type.coarjournal article
dc.description.reviewstatuspeerReviewed
dc.relation.issn2045-2322
dc.relation.volume6
dc.type.versionpublishedVersion
dc.rights.copyright© 2016 the Authors. Published by Nature Publishing Group. This is an open access article licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.
dc.rights.accesslevelopenAccessfi
dc.rights.urlhttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.relation.doi10.1038/srep19974


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© 2016 the Authors. Published by Nature Publishing Group. This is an open access article licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2016 the Authors. Published by Nature Publishing Group. This is an open access article licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.