Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorMikonranta, Lauri
dc.contributor.authorMappes, Johanna
dc.contributor.authorKaukoniitty, Minna
dc.contributor.authorFreitak, Dalial
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-13T10:43:22Z
dc.date.available2014-08-13T10:43:22Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.citationMikonranta, L., Mappes, J., Kaukoniitty, M., & Freitak, D. (2014). Insect immunity: oral exposure to a bacterial pathogen elicits free radical response and protects from a recurring infection. <i>Frontiers in Zoology</i>, <i>11</i>(23). <a href="https://doi.org/10.1186/1742-9994-11-23" target="_blank">https://doi.org/10.1186/1742-9994-11-23</a>
dc.identifier.otherCONVID_23675041
dc.identifier.otherTUTKAID_61852
dc.identifier.urihttps://jyx.jyu.fi/handle/123456789/44010
dc.description.abstractBackground: Previous exposure to a pathogen can help organisms cope with recurring infection. This is widely recognised in vertebrates, but increasing occasions are also being reported in invertebrates where this phenomenon is referred to as immune priming. However, the mechanisms that allow acquired pathogen resistance in insects remain largely unknown. Results: We studied the priming of bacterial resi stance in the larvae of the tiger moth, Parasemia plantaginis using two gram-negative bacteria, a pathogenic Serratia marcescens and a non-pathogenic control, Escherichia coli. Asublethaloraldoseof S. marcescens provided the larvae with effective protection against an otherwise lethal septic infection with the same pathogen five days later. At the same time, we assessed three anti-bacterial defence mechanisms from the larvae that had been primarily expose d to the bacteria via contaminated host plant. Results showed that S. marcescens had induced a higher amount of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the larval haemolymph , possibly protecting the host from the recurring infection. Conclusions: Our study supports the growing evidence of immune priming in insects. It shows that activation of the protective mechanism requires a specific induction, rather than a sheer exposure to any gram-negative bacteria. The findings indicate that systemic pathog en recognition happens via the gut, and suggest that persistent loitering of immune elicitors or anti-microbial molecules are a possible mechanism for the observed prophylaxis. The self-harming effects of ROS molecules are well known, which indicates a potential cost of increased resistance. Together these findings could have important implications on the ecological and epidemiological processes affecting insect and pathogen populations.fi
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherBioMed Central Ltd.
dc.relation.ispartofseriesFrontiers in Zoology
dc.relation.urihttp://www.frontiersinzoology.com/content/11/1/23
dc.subject.otherbacterial resistance
dc.subject.othergram-negative
dc.subject.otherimmune priming
dc.subject.otherimmunological loitering
dc.subject.otherinsect immunity
dc.subject.otherparasemia plantaginis
dc.subject.otherreactive oxygen species
dc.subject.otherSerratia marcescens
dc.titleInsect immunity: oral exposure to a bacterial pathogen elicits free radical response and protects from a recurring infection
dc.typearticle
dc.identifier.urnURN:NBN:fi:jyu-201408132351
dc.contributor.laitosBio- ja ympäristötieteiden laitosfi
dc.contributor.laitosDepartment of Biological and Environmental Scienceen
dc.contributor.oppiaineEkologia ja evoluutiobiologiafi
dc.contributor.oppiaineBiologisten vuorovaikutusten huippututkimusyksikköfi
dc.contributor.oppiaineEcology and Evolutionary Biologyen
dc.contributor.oppiaineCentre of Excellence in Biological Interactions Researchen
dc.type.urihttp://purl.org/eprint/type/JournalArticle
dc.date.updated2014-08-13T03:32:51Z
dc.type.coarjournal article
dc.description.reviewstatuspeerReviewed
dc.relation.issn1742-9994
dc.relation.numberinseries23
dc.relation.volume11
dc.type.versionpublishedVersion
dc.rights.copyright© 2014 Mikonranta et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly credited. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.
dc.rights.accesslevelopenAccessfi
dc.rights.urlhttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0
dc.relation.doi10.1186/1742-9994-11-23


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

© 2014 Mikonranta et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly credited. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2014 Mikonranta et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly credited. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.