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dc.contributor.authorPärssinen, Olavi
dc.contributor.authorSoh, Zhi Da
dc.contributor.authorTan, Chuen‐Seng
dc.contributor.authorLanca, Carla
dc.contributor.authorKauppinen, Markku
dc.contributor.authorSaw, Seang‐Mei
dc.date.accessioned2020-07-31T04:49:46Z
dc.date.available2020-07-31T04:49:46Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.citationPärssinen, O., Soh, Z. D., Tan, C., Lanca, C., Kauppinen, M., & Saw, S. (2021). Comparison of myopic progression in Finnish and Singaporean children. <i>Acta Ophthalmologica</i>, <i>99</i>(2), 171-180. <a href="https://doi.org/10.1111/aos.14545" target="_blank">https://doi.org/10.1111/aos.14545</a>
dc.identifier.otherCONVID_41668833
dc.identifier.urihttps://jyx.jyu.fi/handle/123456789/71296
dc.description.abstractPurpose To compare 3-year myopic progression between Finnish and Singaporean children. Methods Myopic progression was compared between 9-year-old (mean age 9.7 ± 0.4 years, n = 92) and 11-year-old (mean age 11.7 ± 0.4 years, n = 144) Finnish (Finnish RCT) children and Singaporean children matched by age and refraction (SCORMMatched, n = 403) and 7- to 8-year-old Singaporean children matched only by refraction (SCORM Young, n = 186). Spherical equivalent (SE) was between −0.50 and −3.00 D. Refraction with cycloplegia was controlled annually for 3 years. Information on parental myopia, mother’s education, time spent on near-work and outdoor time was gathered by parental questionnaire. Results Three-year myopic progression was −2.08 ± 0.96 D and −1.30 ± 0.69 D in the Finnish RCT and Singaporean SCORM Matched 9-year-olds, respectively, and −1.34 ± 0.78 D, and −0.52 ± 0.44 D in the 11-year-olds, respectively (p < 0.001 between all groups). Myopic progression was fastest (−2.69 ± 0.89 D) in the SCORM 7-year-olds and similar between the SCORM Matched 9-year-olds and Finnish RCT 11-year-olds (p = 0.55). The Finnish RCT and SCORM Matched children showed significant differences in both daily near-work time (1.8 ± 1.0 versus 3.4 ± 1.9 hours per day, p < 0.001) and outdoor time (2.6 ± 0.9 versus 0.5 ± 0.4 hours per day, p < 0.001). These differences did not, however, explain the differences in myopic progression between the groups. More time spent outdoors was associated with less myopic progression in the Finnish RCT (r = 0.17, p = 0.009) group only. In the whole materials, greater myopic progression was associated with younger age at baseline (p < 0.001), younger age was associated with mother’s higher education (p < 0.001), and mothers higher education was associated with myopia in both parents (p < 0.001). Conclusion Age at baseline was the most significant factor associated with myopic progression. However, at the same age and with the same initial refraction, the Finnish and Singaporean children showed different myopic progression. This result remains unexplained. Thus, age of myopia onset should be considered when comparing myopic progression between different samples and conducting treatment trials. Parental myopia may be a weak indicator of heredity of myopia.en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageeng
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell
dc.relation.ispartofseriesActa Ophthalmologica
dc.rightsCC BY-NC-ND 4.0
dc.subject.otherSingapore
dc.subject.otherSuomi
dc.subject.othermyopia progression
dc.subject.othernear work
dc.subject.otheroutdoors
dc.subject.otherage of baseline
dc.subject.otherFinland
dc.titleComparison of myopic progression in Finnish and Singaporean children
dc.typearticle
dc.identifier.urnURN:NBN:fi:jyu-202007315444
dc.contributor.laitosLiikuntatieteellinen tiedekuntafi
dc.contributor.laitosFaculty of Sport and Health Sciencesen
dc.contributor.oppiaineGerontologia ja kansanterveysfi
dc.contributor.oppiaineGerontology and Public Healthen
dc.type.urihttp://purl.org/eprint/type/JournalArticle
dc.description.reviewstatuspeerReviewed
dc.format.pagerange171-180
dc.relation.issn1755-375X
dc.relation.numberinseries2
dc.relation.volume99
dc.type.versionpublishedVersion
dc.rights.copyright© 2020 The Authors. Acta Ophthalmologica published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation
dc.rights.accesslevelopenAccessfi
dc.subject.ysolikinäköisyys
dc.subject.ysolapset (ikäryhmät)
dc.subject.ysoikä
dc.subject.ysotaittovirheet
dc.format.contentfulltext
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p5995
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p4354
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p1229
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p5994
dc.rights.urlhttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.relation.doi10.1111/aos.14545
jyx.fundinginformationThe Finnish Eye Foundation, The Evald and Hilda Nissi Foundation, Singapore Ministry of Health’s National Medical Research Council (NMRC), Grant Number: Singapore‐NMRC/0695/2002


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