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dc.contributor.authorYada, Akie
dc.date.accessioned2020-02-13T13:57:27Z
dc.date.available2020-02-13T13:57:27Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.isbn978-951-39-8073-3
dc.identifier.urihttps://jyx.jyu.fi/handle/123456789/67827
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation aims to examine inclusive education from teachers’ points of view in Japan and Finland. Specifically, it has three aims: a) to examine how teachers’ self-efficacy for inclusive practices relates to teachers’ attitudes towards inclusive education; b) to assess how teachers’ demographic variables influence their self-efficacy and attitudes; and c) to identify sources of teachers’ self-efficacy that might affect their efficacy beliefs in implementing inclusive education. Data were obtained from a total of 620 Japanese and 1995 Finnish teachers through a survey questionnaire and analysed using statistical methods. The analyses revealed that teachers’ self-efficacy for inclusive practices affected their attitudes positively in both Japan and Finland. In addition, teachers’ experience in teaching students with disabilities had a positive effect on their self-efficacy and attitudes in both countries. However, there were some differences between Japan and Finland. First, teachers’ teaching careers predicted their self-efficacy only in Japan; elder teachers were more confident in Japan, but there was no difference between novice and experienced teachers in Finland. Second, the teachers’ teaching careers had a negative effect on their attitudes only in Finland; elder Finnish teachers held more negative attitudes towards inclusive education. Finally, the amount of inclusive education training affected teachers’ self-efficacy and attitudes positively only in Finland. In regard to the four sources of self-efficacy proposed by Bandura (1997), mastery experience had the strongest independent positive effect on self-efficacy in the two countries. Verbal persuasion made a small but significant contribution to self-efficacy in both countries; however, the effect was positive in Finland but negative in Japan. Further, the four sources of self-efficacy explained 54% of variance in teachers’ self-efficacy in the Finnish sample but 15% in the Japanese sample, indicating there may be other sources that influence self-efficacy in Japan. Overall, the findings of this thesis confirm that teachers’ self-efficacy for inclusive practices was positively associated with their attitudes. Moreover, how teachers’ demographic variables and their sources of self-efficacy predicted their efficacy beliefs differ by country, which emphasises the importance of studying inclusive education within cross-cultural frameworks, taking in to account cultural, historical, political and societal contexts.en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherJyväskylän yliopisto
dc.relation.ispartofseriesJYU dissertations
dc.relation.haspart<b>Artikkeli I:</b> Yada, A., & Savolainen, H. (2017). Japanese in-service teachers’ attitudes toward inclusive education and self-efficacy for inclusive practices. <i>Teaching and Teacher Education, 64, 222-229.</i> DOI: <a href="https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2017.02.005"target="_blank">10.1016/j.tate.2017.02.005</a>. JYX: <a href="https://jyx.jyu.fi/handle/123456789/53337"target="_blank"> jyx.jyu.fi/handle/123456789/53337</a>.
dc.relation.haspart<b>Artikkeli II:</b> Yada, A., Tolvanen, A., & Savolainen, H. (2018). Teachers' attitudes and self-efficacy on implementing inclusive education in Japan and Finland : A comparative study using multi-group structural equation modelling. <i>Teaching and Teacher Education, 75, 343-355.</i> DOI: <a href="https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2018.07.011"target="_blank">10.1016/j.tate.2018.07.011</a>. JYX: <a href="https://jyx.jyu.fi/handle/123456789/60218"target="_blank"> jyx.jyu.fi/handle/123456789/60218</a>.
dc.relation.haspart<b>Artikkeli III:</b> Yada, A., Tolvanen, A., Malinen, O.-P., Imai-Matsumura, K., Shimada, H., Koike, R., & Savolainen, H. (2019). Teachers' self-efficacy and the sources of efficacy : A cross-cultural investigation in Japan and Finland. <i>Teaching and Teacher Education, 81, 13-24.</i> DOI: <a href="https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2019.01.014"target="_blank">10.1016/j.tate.2019.01.014</a>. JYX: <a href="https://jyx.jyu.fi/handle/123456789/63809"target="_blank"> jyx.jyu.fi/handle/123456789/63809</a>.
dc.rightsIn Copyright
dc.subjectopettajat
dc.subjecterityisoppilaat
dc.subjectopetus
dc.subjectinkluusio
dc.subjectkoululaiset
dc.subjectoppilaat
dc.subjectopiskelijat
dc.subjectminäpystyvyys
dc.subjectminäkuva
dc.subjectitsetunto
dc.subjectitseluottamus
dc.subjectasenteet
dc.subjectvammaiset
dc.subjecterityisopetus
dc.subjectSuomi
dc.subjectJapani
dc.subjectinclusive education
dc.subjectteacher
dc.subjectself-efficacy
dc.subjectattitudes
dc.titleDifferent Processes Towards Inclusion: A Cross-Cultural Investigation of Teachers’ Self-Efficacy in Japan and Finland
dc.typeDiss.
dc.identifier.urnURN:ISBN:978-951-39-8073-3
dc.contributor.yliopistoUniversity of Jyväskyläen
dc.contributor.yliopistoJyväskylän yliopistofi
dc.relation.issn2489-9003
dc.rights.copyright© The Author & University of Jyväskylä
dc.rights.accesslevelopenAccess
dc.type.publicationdoctoralThesis
dc.format.contentfulltext
dc.rights.urlhttps://rightsstatements.org/page/InC/1.0/


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