Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorLatvala, Antti
dc.contributor.authorRose, Richard J.
dc.contributor.authorPulkkinen, Lea
dc.contributor.authorDick, Danielle M.
dc.contributor.authorKorhonen, Tellervo
dc.contributor.authorKaprio, Jaakko
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-01T06:50:11Z
dc.date.available2019-10-01T06:50:11Z
dc.date.issued2014fi
dc.identifier.citationLatvala, A., Rose, R. J., Pulkkinen, L., Dick, D. M., Korhonen, T., & Kaprio, J. (2014). Drinking, smoking, and educational achievement: Cross-lagged associations from adolescence to adulthood. <em>Drug and Alcohol Dependence</em>, 137 (April), 106-113. <a href="https://doi.org/10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2014.01.016">doi:10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2014.01.016</a>fi
dc.identifier.otherTUTKAID_62170
dc.identifier.urihttps://jyx.jyu.fi/handle/123456789/65688
dc.description.abstractBackground Adolescent substance use is associated with lower educational achievement but the directionality of the association remains uncertain. We analyzed data on drinking, smoking and educational achievement to study the associations between substance use and education from early adolescence to young adulthood. Methods Longitudinal data from four time points (ages 12, 14, 17, and 19–27 years) from a population-based cohort study of Finnish twin individuals were used to estimate bivariate cross-lagged path models for substance use and educational achievement, adjusting for sex, parental covariates, and adolescent externalizing behavior. A total of 4761 individuals (49.4% females) were included in the analyses. Educational achievement was assessed with teacher-reported grade point average at ages 12 and 14, and with self-reported student status and completed education at age 17 and in young adulthood. From self-reported questionnaire items, frequency of any drinking, frequency of drinking to intoxication, any smoking and daily smoking were analyzed. Results Alcohol use and smoking behaviors at ages 12 and 14 predicted lower educational achievement at later time points even after previous achievement and confounding factors were taken into account. Lower school achievement in adolescence predicted a higher likelihood of engaging in smoking behaviors but did not predict later alcohol use. Higher educational attainment at age 17 predicted more frequent drinking in young adulthood. Conclusions Adolescent drinking behaviors are associated with lower future educational achievement independently of prior achievement, whereas smoking both predicts and is predicted by lower achievement. Early substance use indexes elevated risk for poor educational outcomes.fi
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherElsevier Ireland Ltd; International Council on Alcohol and Addictions
dc.relation.ispartofseriesDrug and Alcohol Dependence
dc.rightsIn Copyright
dc.subject.otheradolescentfi
dc.subject.otheralcohol usefi
dc.subject.othersmokingfi
dc.subject.othereducational achievementfi
dc.subject.othercdross-lagged modelfi
dc.subject.otherlongitudinalfi
dc.titleDrinking, smoking, and educational achievement: Cross-lagged associations from adolescence to adulthoodfi
dc.typearticle
dc.identifier.urnURN:NBN:fi:jyu-201909104088
dc.contributor.laitosPsykologian laitosfi
dc.contributor.laitosDepartment of Psychologyen
dc.contributor.oppiainePsykologia (ytk)
dc.type.urihttp://purl.org/eprint/type/JournalArticle
dc.date.updated2019-09-10T15:15:14Z
dc.description.reviewstatuspeerReviewed
dc.format.pagerange106 113
dc.relation.issn0376-8716
dc.relation.numberinseriesApril
dc.relation.volume137
dc.type.versionacceptedVersion
dc.rights.copyright© 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd
dc.rights.accesslevelopenAccessfi
dc.format.contentfulltext
dc.rights.urlhttp://rightsstatements.org/page/InC/1.0/?language=en
dc.relation.doi10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2014.01.016


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

In Copyright
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as In Copyright