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dc.contributor.authorNokelainen, Ossi
dc.contributor.authorvan Bergen, Erik
dc.contributor.authorRipley, Brad S.
dc.contributor.authorBrakefield, Paul M.
dc.date.accessioned2018-06-06T11:32:53Z
dc.date.available2018-12-23T22:35:23Z
dc.date.issued2018fi
dc.identifier.citationNokelainen, O., van Bergen, E., Ripley, B. S., & Brakefield, P. M. (2018). Adaptation of a tropical butterfly to a temperate climate. <em>Biological Journal of the Linnean Society</em>, 123 (2), 279-289. <a href="https://doi.org/10.1093/biolinnean/blx145">doi:10.1093/biolinnean/blx145</a>fi
dc.identifier.otherTUTKAID_76751
dc.identifier.urihttps://jyx.jyu.fi/handle/123456789/58401
dc.description.abstractDevelopmental plasticity enables organisms to cope with environmental heterogeneity, such as seasonal variation in climatic conditions, and is thought to affect a species’ capability to adapt to environments with novel seasonal and ecological dynamics. We studied developmental plasticity of the widespread tropical butterfly, Bicyclus safitza, which reaches the southern edge of its distribution in the temperate zone of South Africa. In wet–dry seasonal environments in tropical Africa, adults of Bicyclus butterflies are present all year round and exhibit discrete seasonal forms in alternating generations. We demonstrate that a population that colonized a more temperate climate region has adopted a different strategy to cope with the local environment. No active adults were encountered during the temperate winter. The flight season coincided with a period when evaporation stress was lowest and temperatures were higher in the South African population. Butterflies collected from the field did not express seasonal polyphenism or show full expression of the tropical wet season form phenotype. Reaction norm experiments comparing stocks from South Africa and Uganda indicated that local adaptation of this tropical butterfly to a more temperate climate involved changes in the degree of developmental plasticity, such that a more robust development in response to thermal variation was observed for a broad suite of morphological and life-history traits. Our findings have implications for understanding the mechanisms that facilitate expansion into a novel ecological niche in seasonally variable climatic conditions.fi
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherThe Linnean Society of London; Oxford University Press
dc.relation.ispartofseriesBiological Journal of the Linnean Society
dc.rightsIn Copyright
dc.subject.otherperhosetfi
dc.subject.othersopeutuminenfi
dc.subject.otherilmastovyöhykkeetfi
dc.subject.otherfenotyyppifi
dc.subject.otherLepidopterafi
dc.subject.otheradaptation (change)fi
dc.subject.otherclimatic zonesfi
dc.subject.otherphenotypefi
dc.titleAdaptation of a tropical butterfly to a temperate climatefi
dc.typearticle
dc.identifier.urnURN:NBN:fi:jyu-201805292878
dc.contributor.laitosBio- ja ympäristötieteiden laitosfi
dc.contributor.laitosThe Department of Biological and Environmental Scienceen
dc.contributor.oppiaineEkologia ja evoluutiobiologia
dc.type.urihttp://purl.org/eprint/type/JournalArticle
dc.date.updated2018-05-29T09:15:08Z
dc.description.reviewstatuspeerReviewed
dc.format.pagerange279-289
dc.relation.issn0024-4066
dc.relation.numberinseries2
dc.relation.volume123
dc.type.versionacceptedVersion
dc.rights.copyright© 2017 The Linnean Society of London, Biological Journal of the Linnean Society.
dc.rights.accesslevelopenAccessfi
dc.format.contentfulltext
dc.rights.urlhttp://rightsstatements.org/page/InC/1.0/?language=en
dc.relation.doi10.1093/biolinnean/blx145


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