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dc.contributor.authorHahn, Juliane
dc.contributor.authorJuottonen, Heli
dc.contributor.authorFritze, Hannu
dc.contributor.authorTuittila, Eeva-Stiina
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-09T10:08:07Z
dc.date.available2019-04-17T21:35:43Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.citationHahn, J., Juottonen, H., Fritze, H., & Tuittila, E.-S. (2018). Dung application increases CH4 production potential and alters the composition and abundance of methanogen community in restored peatland soils from Europe. <em>Biology and Fertility of Soils</em>, 54 (4), 533-547. <a href="https://doi.org/10.1007/s00374-018-1279-4">doi:10.1007/s00374-018-1279-4</a>
dc.identifier.otherTUTKAID_77405
dc.identifier.urihttps://jyx.jyu.fi/handle/123456789/57902
dc.description.abstractPeatland restoration via rewetting aims to recover biological communities and biogeochemical processes typical to pristine peatlands. While rewetting promotes recovery of C accumulation favorable for climate mitigation, it also promotes methane (CH4) emissions. The potential for exceptionally high emissions after rewetting has been measured for Central European peatland sites previously grazed by cattle. We addressed the hypothesis that these exceptionally high CH4 emissions result from the previous land use. We analyzed the effects of cattle dung application to peat soils in a short- (2 weeks), a medium- (1 year) and a long-term (grazing) approach. We measured the CH4 production potentials, determined the numbers of methanogens by mcrA qPCR, and analyzed the methanogen community by mcrA T-RFLP-cloning-sequencing. Dung application significantly increased the CH4 production potential in the short- and the medium-term approach and non-significantly at the cattle-grazed site. The number of methanogens correlated with the CH4 production in the short- and the long-term approach. At all three time horizons, we found a shift in methanogen community due to dung application and a transfer of rumen methanogen sequences (Methanobrevibacter spp.) to the peatland soil that seemed related to increased CH4 production potential. Our findings indicate that cattle grazing of drained peatlands changes their methanogenic microbial community, may introduce rumen-associated methanogens and leads to increased CH4 production. Consequently, rewetting of previously cattle-grazed peatlands has the potential to lead to increased CH4 emissions. Careful consideration of land use history is crucial for successful climate mitigation with peatland rewetting.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherSpringer
dc.relation.ispartofseriesBiology and Fertility of Soils
dc.subject.otherturvemaat
dc.subject.otherlaitumet
dc.subject.otherennallistaminen
dc.subject.otherlanta
dc.subject.otherkasvihuonekaasut
dc.subject.othermetaani
dc.subject.otherclimate mitigation
dc.subject.otherrewetting
dc.subject.othermethane
dc.subject.othercattle grazing
dc.subject.othermethanogen
dc.subject.otherland use
dc.titleDung application increases CH4 production potential and alters the composition and abundance of methanogen community in restored peatland soils from Europe
dc.typearticle
dc.identifier.urnURN:NBN:fi:jyu-201805032446
dc.contributor.laitosBio- ja ympäristötieteiden laitosfi
dc.contributor.laitosThe Department of Biological and Environmental Scienceen
dc.contributor.oppiaineEkologia ja evoluutiobiologia
dc.type.urihttp://purl.org/eprint/type/JournalArticle
dc.date.updated2018-05-03T12:15:10Z
dc.description.reviewstatuspeerReviewed
dc.format.pagerange533-547
dc.relation.issn0178-2762
dc.relation.numberinseries4
dc.relation.volume54
dc.type.versionacceptedVersion
dc.rights.copyright© Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2018. This is a final draft version of an article whose final and definitive form has been published by Springer. Published in this repository with the kind permission of the publisher.
dc.rights.accesslevelopenAccessfi
dc.format.contentfulltext
dc.relation.doi10.1007/s00374-018-1279-4


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