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dc.contributor.authorMikkonen, Anu
dc.contributor.authorYläranta, Kati
dc.contributor.authorTiirola, Marja
dc.contributor.authorAmbrosio Leal Dutra, Lara
dc.contributor.authorSalmi, Pauliina
dc.contributor.authorRomantschuk, Martin
dc.contributor.authorCopley, Shelley
dc.contributor.authorIkäheimo, Jukka
dc.contributor.authorSinkkonen, Aki
dc.date.accessioned2018-03-27T06:06:45Z
dc.date.available2020-07-01T21:35:15Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.citationMikkonen, A., Yläranta, K., Tiirola, M., Ambrosio Leal Dutra, L., Salmi, P., Romantschuk, M., Copley, S., Ikäheimo, J., & Sinkkonen, A. (2018). Successful aerobic bioremediation of groundwater contaminated with higher chlorinated phenols by indigenous degrader bacteria. <i>Water Research</i>, <i>138</i>, 118-128. <a href="https://doi.org/10.1016/j.watres.2018.03.033" target="_blank">https://doi.org/10.1016/j.watres.2018.03.033</a>
dc.identifier.otherCONVID_27948709
dc.identifier.otherTUTKAID_77061
dc.identifier.urihttps://jyx.jyu.fi/handle/123456789/57432
dc.description.abstractThe xenobiotic priority pollutant pentachlorophenol has been used as a timber preservative in a polychlorophenol bulk synthesis product containing also tetrachlorophenol and trichlorophenol. Highly soluble chlorophenol salts have leaked into groundwater, causing severe contamination of large aquifers. Natural attenuation of higher-chlorinated phenols (HCPs: pentachlorophenol + tetrachlorophenol) at historically polluted sites has been inefficient, but a 4-year full scale in situ biostimulation of a chlorophenol-contaminated aquifer by circulation and re-infiltration of aerated groundwater was remarkably successful: pentachlorophenol decreased from 400 μg L−1 to <1 μg L−1 and tetrachlorophenols from 4000 μg L−1 to <10 μg L−1. The pcpB gene, the gene encoding pentachlorophenol hydroxylase - the first and rate-limiting enzyme in the only fully characterised aerobic HCP degradation pathway - was present in up to 10% of the indigenous bacteria already 4 months after the start of aeration. The novel quantitative PCR assay detected the pcpB gene in situ also in the chlorophenol plume of another historically polluted aquifer with no remediation history. Hotspot groundwater HCPs from this site were degraded efficiently during a 3-week microcosm incubation with one-time aeration but no other additives: from 5400 μg L−1 to 1200 μg L−1 and to 200 μg L−1 in lightly and fully aerated microcosms, respectively, coupled with up to 2400% enrichment of the pcpB gene. Accumulation of lower-chlorinated metabolites was observed in neither in situ remediation nor microcosms, supporting the assumption that HCP removal was due to the aerobic degradation pathway where the first step limits the mineralisation rate. Our results demonstrate that bacteria capable of aerobic mineralisation of xenobiotic pentachlorophenol and tetrachlorophenol can be present at long-term polluted groundwater sites, making bioremediation by simple aeration a viable and economically attractive alternative.
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherIWA Publishing
dc.relation.ispartofseriesWater Research
dc.subject.otherin situ bioremediation
dc.subject.otherpcpB gene
dc.subject.otherpentachlorophenol hydroxylase
dc.subject.otherquantitative PCR
dc.subject.otherion PGM amplicon sequencing
dc.subject.otherSphingomonas sensu lato
dc.titleSuccessful aerobic bioremediation of groundwater contaminated with higher chlorinated phenols by indigenous degrader bacteria
dc.typearticle
dc.identifier.urnURN:NBN:fi:jyu-201803261830
dc.contributor.laitosBio- ja ympäristötieteiden laitosfi
dc.contributor.laitosDepartment of Biological and Environmental Scienceen
dc.contributor.oppiaineYmpäristötiedefi
dc.contributor.oppiaineEnvironmental Scienceen
dc.type.urihttp://purl.org/eprint/type/JournalArticle
dc.date.updated2018-03-26T06:15:04Z
dc.description.reviewstatuspeerReviewed
dc.format.pagerange118-128
dc.relation.issn0043-1354
dc.relation.numberinseries0
dc.relation.volume138
dc.type.versionacceptedVersion
dc.rights.copyright© 2018 Elsevier Ltd. This is a final draft version of an article whose final and definitive form has been published by Elsevier. Published in this repository with the kind permission of the publisher.
dc.rights.accesslevelopenAccessfi
dc.relation.grantnumber615146
dc.relation.grantnumber615146
dc.relation.projectidinfo:eu-repo/grantAgreement/EC/FP7/615146/EU//
dc.subject.ysobiologinen puhdistus
dc.subject.ysokloorifenolit
dc.subject.ysobakteerit
dc.subject.ysopohjavesi
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p18477
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p9603
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p1749
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p2649
dc.relation.doi10.1016/j.watres.2018.03.033
dc.relation.funderEuroopan komissiofi
dc.relation.funderEuropean Commissionen
jyx.fundingprogramEU:n 7. puiteohjelma (FP7)fi
jyx.fundingprogramFP7 (EU's 7th Framework Programme)en
jyx.fundinginformationThis work was supported by the Academy of Finland [grant numbers 139847, 260797]; the European Research Council under the European Union's Seventh Framework Programme [FP/2007-450 2013, grant number 615146]; and Koskinen Oy (Kärkölä remediation and groundwater analyses, including consultancy by Jukka Ikäheimo). The other authors declare no conflict of interest. Funding sources had no involvement in the interpretation of data, writing of the report or the decision to submit the article for publication.


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