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dc.contributor.authorBarthelemy, Hélène
dc.contributor.authorStark, Sari
dc.contributor.authorKytöviita, Minna-Maarit
dc.contributor.authorOlofsson, Johan
dc.date.accessioned2017-11-14T12:09:19Z
dc.date.available2018-07-04T21:35:32Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.citationBarthelemy, H., Stark, S., Kytöviita, M.-M., & Olofsson, J. (2017). Grazing decreases N partitioning among coexisting plant species. <i>Functional Ecology</i>, <i>31</i>(11), 2051-2060. <a href="https://doi.org/10.1111/1365-2435.12917" target="_blank">https://doi.org/10.1111/1365-2435.12917</a>
dc.identifier.otherCONVID_27055285
dc.identifier.otherTUTKAID_74079
dc.identifier.urihttps://jyx.jyu.fi/handle/123456789/55877
dc.description.abstractHerbivores play a key role in shaping ecosystem structure and functions by influencing plant and microbial community composition and nutrient cycling. This study investigated the long‐term effects of herbivores on plant resource acquisition. We explored differences in the natural δ15N signatures in plant, microbial and soil N pools, and examined mycorrhizal colonization in two tundra sites that have been either lightly or heavily grazed by reindeer for more than 50 years. The study examined changes in nutrient acquisition in five common tundra plants with contrasting traits and mycorrhiza status; the mycorrhizal dwarf shrubs, Betula nana, Vaccinium myrtillus and Empetrum hermaphroditum; a mycorrhizal grass, Deschampsia flexuosa, and a non‐mycorrhizal sedge, Carex bigelowii. There were large variations in δ15N among coexisting plant species in the lightly grazed sites. This variation was dramatically reduced in the heavily grazed sites. At an individual species level, δ15N was higher in E. hermaphroditum and lower in C. bigelowii in the heavily grazed sites. Mycorrhizal colonization in B. nana and E. hermaphroditum roots were also lower in the heavily grazed sites. The δ15N signatures of the total soil N pool and of the microbial N pools were higher in the heavily grazed sites. Since the strong δ15N differentiation among plant species has been interpreted as a result of plants with different mycorrhizal types using different sources of soil nitrogen, we suggest that the lower variation in δ15N in heavily grazed sites indicates a lower niche differentiation in nitrogen uptake among plants. Reduced mycorrhiza‐mediated nitrogen uptake by some of the species, a shift towards a more mineral nutrition due to higher nutrient turnover, and uptake of labile nitrogen from dung and urine in the heavily grazed sites could all contribute to the changes in plant δ15N. We conclude that herbivores have the potential to influence plant nutrient uptake and provide the first data suggesting that herbivores decrease nutrient partitioning on the basis of chemical N forms among plant species. Reduced niche complementarity among species is potentially important for estimates of the effects of herbivory on plant nutrient availability and species coexistence.en
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
dc.relation.ispartofseriesFunctional Ecology
dc.subject.otherabove-belowground linkages
dc.subject.otherarctic tundra
dc.subject.othermicrobial N biomass
dc.subject.othermycorrhizal colonization
dc.subject.othernutrient cycling
dc.subject.otherplant-herbivore interactions
dc.subject.otherplant nutrient uptake
dc.subject.otherungulate grazing
dc.titleGrazing decreases N partitioning among coexisting plant species
dc.typearticle
dc.identifier.urnURN:NBN:fi:jyu-201711034133
dc.contributor.laitosBio- ja ympäristötieteiden laitosfi
dc.contributor.laitosDepartment of Biological and Environmental Scienceen
dc.contributor.oppiaineEkologia ja evoluutiobiologiafi
dc.contributor.oppiaineEcology and Evolutionary Biologyen
dc.type.urihttp://purl.org/eprint/type/JournalArticle
dc.date.updated2017-11-03T10:15:08Z
dc.type.coarjournal article
dc.description.reviewstatuspeerReviewed
dc.format.pagerange2051-2060
dc.relation.issn0269-8463
dc.relation.numberinseries11
dc.relation.volume31
dc.type.versionacceptedVersion
dc.rights.copyright© 2017 The Authors, Functional Ecology, British Ecological Society. This is a final draft version of an article whose final and definitive form has been published by Wiley-Blackwell. Published in this repository with the kind permission of the publisher.
dc.rights.accesslevelopenAccessfi
dc.subject.ysokasvit
dc.subject.ysotundra
dc.subject.ysoravintoaineet
dc.subject.ysoravinteet
dc.subject.ysoravinnekierto
dc.subject.ysobiomassa (teollisuus)
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p1755
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p16902
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p3939
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p3938
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p22936
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p6170
dc.relation.datasethttps://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.78084
dc.relation.doi10.1111/1365-2435.12917
jyx.fundinginformationhis study was supported by the grants from Stiftelsen Oscar och Lili Lamns Minne, Formas 2012‐230, and the Nordic Centre of Excellence TUNDRA, funded by the Norden Top‐Level Research Initiative “Effect Studies and Adaptation to Climate Change.”


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