Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorCayol, Claire
dc.date.accessioned2017-10-20T10:29:44Z
dc.date.available2017-10-20T10:29:44Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.isbn978-951-39-7206-6
dc.identifier.otheroai:jykdok.linneanet.fi:1726442
dc.identifier.urihttps://jyx.jyu.fi/handle/123456789/55663
dc.description.abstractInfectious diseases are amongst the ten major causes of human mortality worldwide, 60% of them being animal-borne. Variations of abiotic and biotic conditions are likely to modify the transmission of parasites and pathogens within reservoir species, and, as a consequence, alter the zoonotic risk for human. My thesis aims at elucidating the dynamics and mechanisms of the maintenance of ticks, tick-borne pathogens (TBPs) and the Puumala hantavirus (PUUV) in the reservoir host, the bank vole (Myodes glareolus, BV). In Northern Europe, tick-borne diseases are growing in importance to human because of the latitudinal expansion of the tick Ixodes ricinus. Field monitoring revealed that I. ricinus was the only species found in the vegetation in Central Finland. The abundance of immature I. ricinus in nature was positively associated with the BV abundance. The highest risk periods for tick bites on humans were May– June and September. Ixodes ricinus was positively associated with open water coverage and human density, which might offer suitable moisture conditions and anthropogenic modifications favouring the species. The infection of BV with the zoonotic B. burgdorferi s.l. was associated with the abundance of I. ricinus at the site, indicating that this tick species was required for the transmission and persistence of this pathogen. An experiment revealed, for the first time, that B. afzelii can modify the behaviour and the breeding success of its host, and these effects are both sex- and size-specific and density-dependent. Space-state modelling of longitudinal field data revealed that PUUV infection likelihood was the lowest in BV previously infested with vectors in comparison to Anaplasma phagocytophilum infected BV, or individuals without any previous infections. Altogether, this study shows how seasonality, co-infecting pathogens and host population density influence the risk of tick-borne pathogens and the zoonotic risk in Central Finland.
dc.format.extent1 verkkoaineisto (54 sivua, 25 sivua useina numerointijaksoina) : kuvitettu, karttoja
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherUniversity of Jyväskylä
dc.relation.ispartofseriesJyväskylä studies in biological and environmental science
dc.relation.isversionofYhteenveto-osa ja 4 eripainosta julkaistu myös painettuna.
dc.subject.otherBorrelia burgdorferi s.l
dc.subject.otherMyodes glareolus
dc.subject.otherPuumala hantavirus
dc.subject.otherdisease ecology
dc.subject.othereco-epidemiology
dc.subject.otherreservoir
dc.subject.othertick-borne pathogens
dc.titleEco-epidemiology of tick- and rodent-borne pathogens in boreal forests
dc.typeDiss.fi
dc.identifier.urnURN:ISBN:978-951-39-7206-6
dc.type.dcmitypeTexten
dc.type.ontasotVäitöskirjafi
dc.type.ontasotDoctoral dissertationen
dc.contributor.tiedekuntaMatemaattis-luonnontieteellinen tiedekuntafi
dc.contributor.tiedekuntaFaculty of Mathematics and Scienceen
dc.contributor.yliopistoUniversity of Jyväskyläen
dc.contributor.yliopistoJyväskylän yliopistofi
dc.contributor.oppiaineEkologia ja evoluutiobiologiafi
dc.relation.issn1456-9701
dc.relation.numberinseries336
dc.rights.accesslevelopenAccessfi
dc.subject.ysopuutiaiset
dc.subject.ysopunkit
dc.subject.ysotaudinaiheuttajat
dc.subject.ysoBorrelia-bakteerit
dc.subject.ysoPuumala-virus
dc.subject.ysoleviäminen
dc.subject.ysoisäntäeläimet
dc.subject.ysomyyrät
dc.subject.ysometsämyyrä
dc.subject.ysojyrsijät
dc.subject.ysometsäekosysteemit
dc.subject.ysopopulaatioekologia
dc.subject.ysoboreaalinen vyöhyke
dc.subject.ysoekologia
dc.subject.ysoepidemiologia
dc.subject.ysohantavirukset
dc.subject.ysozoonoosit


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record