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dc.contributor.authorBoratynski, Zbyszek
dc.contributor.authorBrito, José C.
dc.contributor.authorCampos, João C.
dc.contributor.authorCunha, José L.
dc.contributor.authorGranjon, Laurent
dc.contributor.authorMappes, Tapio
dc.contributor.authorNdiaye, Arame
dc.contributor.authorRzebik-Kowalska, Barbara
dc.contributor.authorSerén, Nina
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-03T09:48:21Z
dc.date.available2017-07-03T09:48:21Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.citationBoratynski, Z., Brito, J. C., Campos, J. C., Cunha, J. L., Granjon, L., Mappes, T., Ndiaye, A., Rzebik-Kowalska, B., & Serén, N. (2017). Repeated evolution of camouflage in speciose desert rodents. <i>Scientific Reports</i>, <i>7</i>, Article 3522. <a href="https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-017-03444-y" target="_blank">https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-017-03444-y</a>
dc.identifier.otherCONVID_27071933
dc.identifier.otherTUTKAID_74170
dc.identifier.urihttps://jyx.jyu.fi/handle/123456789/54807
dc.description.abstractThere are two main factors explaining variation among species and the evolution of characters along phylogeny: adaptive change, including phenotypic and genetic responses to selective pressures, and phylogenetic inertia, or the resemblance between species due to shared phylogenetic history. Phenotype-habitat colour match, a classic Darwinian example of the evolution of camouflage (crypsis), offers the opportunity to test the importance of historical versus ecological mechanisms in shaping phenotypes among phylogenetically closely related taxa. To assess it, we investigated fur (phenotypic data) and habitat (remote sensing data) colourations, along with phylogenetic information, in the species-rich Gerbillus genus. Overall, we found a strong phenotype-habitat match, once the phylogenetic signal is taken into account. We found that camouflage has been acquired and lost repeatedly in the course of the evolutionary history of Gerbillus. Our results suggest that fur colouration and its covariation with habitat is a relatively labile character in mammals, potentially responding quickly to selection. Relatively unconstrained and substantial genetic basis, as well as structural and functional independence from other fitness traits of mammalian colouration might be responsible for that observation.
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherNature Publishing Group
dc.relation.ispartofseriesScientific Reports
dc.subject.othercamouflage
dc.subject.otherspeciose desert rodents
dc.titleRepeated evolution of camouflage in speciose desert rodents
dc.typearticle
dc.identifier.urnURN:NBN:fi:jyu-201706283116
dc.contributor.laitosBio- ja ympäristötieteiden laitosfi
dc.contributor.laitosDepartment of Biological and Environmental Scienceen
dc.contributor.oppiaineEkologia ja evoluutiobiologiafi
dc.contributor.oppiaineEcology and Evolutionary Biologyen
dc.type.urihttp://purl.org/eprint/type/JournalArticle
dc.date.updated2017-06-28T03:17:02Z
dc.type.coarjournal article
dc.description.reviewstatuspeerReviewed
dc.relation.issn2045-2322
dc.relation.numberinseries0
dc.relation.volume7
dc.type.versionpublishedVersion
dc.rights.copyright© the Authors, 2017. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.
dc.rights.accesslevelopenAccessfi
dc.subject.ysoevoluutio
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p8278
dc.rights.urlhttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.relation.doi10.1038/s41598-017-03444-y


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© the Authors, 2017. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of a  Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © the Authors, 2017. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.