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dc.contributor.authorYang, Xiaolin
dc.contributor.authorKankaanpää, Anna
dc.contributor.authorBiddle, Stuart J. H.
dc.contributor.authorHirvensalo, Mirja
dc.contributor.authorHelajärvi, Harri
dc.contributor.authorKallio, Jouni
dc.contributor.authorHutri-Kähönen, Nina
dc.contributor.authorTelama, Risto
dc.contributor.authorViikari, Jorma S. A.
dc.contributor.authorRaitakari, Olli T.
dc.contributor.authorTammelin, Tuija
dc.date.accessioned2016-12-21T07:18:54Z
dc.date.available2016-12-21T07:18:54Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.citationYang, X., Kankaanpää, A., Biddle, S. J. H., Hirvensalo, M., Helajärvi, H., Kallio, J., . . . Tammelin, T. (2017). Tracking of Television Viewing Time during Adulthood : The Young Finns Study. <em>Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise</em>, 49 (1), 71-77. <a href="https://doi.org/10.1249/MSS.0000000000001072">doi:10.1249/MSS.0000000000001072</a>
dc.identifier.otherTUTKAID_71067
dc.identifier.urihttps://jyx.jyu.fi/handle/123456789/52496
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the tracking of television viewing (TV) time as an indicator of sedentary behavior among adults for a period of 25 yr. Methods: A random sample of 1601 subjects (740 men) age 18, 21, and 24 yr participated in the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study in 1986. TV time during leisure time was measured with a single self-report question at baseline and in 2001, 2007, and 2011. Tracking of TV time was analyzed using Spearman rank correlations and simplex models. Level and change of TV time were examined using linear growth modeling. Results: The 4- and 6-yr integrated TV time stability coefficients, adjusted for measurement errors, were Q0.60 in adulthood and quite similar for both men and women. The stability coefficients tended to decline as the time interval increased. The stability of the indirect estimation of TV time for a 25-yr period was moderately or highly significant for both genders in most age groups. Younger age, but not gender, was found to be associated with a higher initial level of TV time. Male gender and older age were found to be significantly associated with the slope of TV time. Conclusion: The stability of TV time is predominantly moderate to high during adulthood and varies somewhat by age and gender.
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins; American College of Sports Medicine
dc.relation.ispartofseriesMedicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
dc.subject.othersedentary behavior
dc.subject.otheradult population
dc.subject.otherstability
dc.subject.othermultilevel analysis
dc.subject.otherage cohorts
dc.subject.otherTV viewing
dc.titleTracking of Television Viewing Time during Adulthood : The Young Finns Study
dc.typearticle
dc.identifier.urnURN:NBN:fi:jyu-201612205183
dc.contributor.laitosLiikuntakasvatuksen laitosfi
dc.contributor.laitosDepartment of Sport Sciencesen
dc.contributor.oppiaineLiikuntapedagogiikka
dc.type.urihttp://purl.org/eprint/type/JournalArticle
dc.date.updated2016-12-20T07:15:08Z
dc.type.coarjournal article
dc.description.reviewstatuspeerReviewed
dc.format.pagerange71-77
dc.relation.issn0195-9131
dc.relation.volume49
dc.type.versionpublishedVersion
dc.rights.copyright© 2016 the Author(s). Published by Wolters Kluwer Health on behalf of the American College of Sports Medicine. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0.
dc.rights.accesslevelopenAccessfi
dc.rights.urlhttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.relation.doi10.1249/MSS.0000000000001072


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© 2016 the Author(s). Published by Wolters Kluwer Health on
behalf of the American College of Sports Medicine. This is an open-access
article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non
Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2016 the Author(s). Published by Wolters Kluwer Health on behalf of the American College of Sports Medicine. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0.