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dc.contributor.authorEgan, Sarah J.
dc.contributor.authorBodill, Kate
dc.contributor.authorWatson, Hunna J.
dc.contributor.authorValentine, Emily
dc.contributor.authorShu, Chloe
dc.contributor.authorHagger, Martin
dc.date.accessioned2016-11-24T11:37:23Z
dc.date.available2018-11-11T22:35:28Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.citationEgan, S. J., Bodill, K., Watson, H. J., Valentine, E., Shu, C., & Hagger, M. (2017). Compulsive exercise as a mediator between clinical perfectionism and eating pathology. <i>Eating Behaviors</i>, <i>24</i>, 11-16. <a href="https://doi.org/10.1016/j.eatbeh.2016.11.001" target="_blank">https://doi.org/10.1016/j.eatbeh.2016.11.001</a>
dc.identifier.otherCONVID_26310456
dc.identifier.otherTUTKAID_71695
dc.identifier.urihttps://jyx.jyu.fi/handle/123456789/51994
dc.description.abstractThe aim of this study was to examine whether compulsive exercise mediates the relationship between clinical perfectionism and eating pathology, based on the cognitive behavioral model of compulsive exercise. Participants were 368 adults who participated regularly in sport/exercise and completed online measures of perfectionism, compulsive exercise and eating disorders. In support of the well-established link between perfectionism and eating disorders, clinical perfectionism predicted eating pathology both directly and indirectly mediated by compulsive exercise. In addition, there were also direct effects of clinical perfectionism on the avoidance/rule-driven behavior, weight control, and mood improvement subscales of the Compulsive Exercise Test (CET). There was a direct effect of the CET weight control subscale on eating pathology and a negative direct effect of the CET subscale mood improvement on eating pathology. Findings lend support to the cognitive behavioral model of compulsive exercise in which clinical perfectionism is conceptualized as related to eating disorders directly and indirectly through the mediation of compulsive exercise. Compulsive exercise was also found to have a direct effect on eating disorders. Compulsive exercise may be a symptom of eating pathology, rather than an antecedent, however causal inferences could not be established given the correlational design. Longitudinal research using cross-lagged panel designs to examine a bidirectional relationship between compulsive exercise and eating disorders is needed.
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherPergamon
dc.relation.ispartofseriesEating Behaviors
dc.subject.othercompulsive exercise
dc.subject.othereating disorder
dc.subject.othermediation
dc.titleCompulsive exercise as a mediator between clinical perfectionism and eating pathology
dc.typearticle
dc.identifier.urnURN:NBN:fi:jyu-201611214689
dc.contributor.laitosLiikuntatieteellinen tiedekuntafi
dc.contributor.laitosFaculty of Sport and Health Sciencesen
dc.contributor.oppiaineLiikuntapsykologiafi
dc.contributor.oppiaineSport and Exercise Psychologyen
dc.type.urihttp://purl.org/eprint/type/JournalArticle
dc.date.updated2016-11-21T07:15:03Z
dc.type.coarjournal article
dc.description.reviewstatuspeerReviewed
dc.format.pagerange11-16
dc.relation.issn1471-0153
dc.relation.numberinseries0
dc.relation.volume24
dc.type.versionacceptedVersion
dc.rights.copyright© 2016 Published by Elsevier Ltd. This is a final draft version of an article whose final and definitive form has been published by Elsevier. Published in this repository with the kind permission of the publisher.
dc.rights.accesslevelopenAccessfi
dc.subject.ysoperfektionismi
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p26902
dc.relation.doi10.1016/j.eatbeh.2016.11.001


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