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dc.contributor.authorPulkkinen, Katja
dc.contributor.authorAalto, Sanni L.
dc.contributor.authorNykänen, Hannu
dc.date.accessioned2016-11-02T12:21:24Z
dc.date.available2017-09-21T21:45:07Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.citationPulkkinen, K., Aalto, S. L., & Nykänen, H. (2016). Parasite infection alters host stable-isotope composition under controlled feeding. <i>Freshwater Biology</i>, <i>61</i>(11), 1981-1990. <a href="https://doi.org/10.1111/fwb.12831" target="_blank">https://doi.org/10.1111/fwb.12831</a>
dc.identifier.otherCONVID_26228519
dc.identifier.otherTUTKAID_71250
dc.identifier.urihttps://jyx.jyu.fi/handle/123456789/51795
dc.description.abstract1) Stable isotopes are widely used for studying trophic relationships, but variation driven by environmental conditions or food availability complicates the interpretation of trophic dynamics. Parasites are ubiquitous and known to affect physiological functions of their hosts, but only few studies have assessed the effects of parasites on isotope composition of hosts. 2) We measured the changes in two of the most commonly used stable isotopes in food-web studies, nitrogen (i.e. 15N:14N ratio; denoted as δ15N) and carbon (13C:12C; δ13C) in Daphnia hosts exposed to infection by a parasitic micosporidian in the laboratory. Isotopic signatures of hosts fed a standardised controlled diet were compared with uninfected animals under conditions of high food availability and under food limitation. 3) Parasite infection led to enriched δ15N and δ13C values that were associated with decreased growth and decreased lipid content, indicating energy limitation comparable to that in food-limited animals. However, enrichment in 13C values was apparent sooner in infected well-fed animals than in the food-limited animals, suggesting strong parasite-induced effects on host C-metabolism. 4) By using experimental exposure to parasite infection and a standardised diet, our study excluded the effects of changes in food sources via parasite-induced altered habitat or feeding behaviour on host isotope composition and demonstrated for the first time that parasite infection directly alters the isotopic values of the host. 5) Our study demonstrates that parasite-induced changes in isotope values may add to the variability in the estimates of the contribution of each food type assimilated by consumers, and thus should be taken into account during investigations of trophic relationships and food webs.
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing
dc.relation.ispartofseriesFreshwater Biology
dc.subject.othercarbon isotopes
dc.subject.otherenergy limitation
dc.subject.otherfood source
dc.subject.otherhost–parasite interaction
dc.subject.othernitrogen isotopes
dc.titleParasite infection alters host stable-isotope composition under controlled feeding
dc.typearticle
dc.identifier.urnURN:NBN:fi:jyu-201611014514
dc.contributor.laitosBio- ja ympäristötieteiden laitosfi
dc.contributor.laitosDepartment of Biological and Environmental Scienceen
dc.contributor.oppiaineAkvaattiset tieteetfi
dc.contributor.oppiaineAquatic Sciencesen
dc.type.urihttp://purl.org/eprint/type/JournalArticle
dc.date.updated2016-11-01T07:15:03Z
dc.type.coarjournal article
dc.description.reviewstatuspeerReviewed
dc.format.pagerange1981-1990
dc.relation.issn0046-5070
dc.relation.numberinseries11
dc.relation.volume61
dc.type.versionacceptedVersion
dc.rights.copyright© 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd. This is a final draft version of an article whose final and definitive form has been published by Wiley. Published in this repository with the kind permission of the publisher.
dc.rights.accesslevelopenAccessfi
dc.relation.doi10.1111/fwb.12831


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