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dc.contributor.authorLohvansuu, Kaisa
dc.contributor.authorHämäläinen, Jarmo
dc.contributor.authorTanskanen, Annika
dc.contributor.authorErvast, Leena
dc.contributor.authorHeikkinen, Elisa
dc.contributor.authorLyytinen, Heikki
dc.contributor.authorLeppänen, Paavo H.T.
dc.date.accessioned2014-11-06T07:36:24Z
dc.date.available2014-11-06T07:36:24Z
dc.date.issued2014fi
dc.identifier.citationLohvansuu, K., Hämäläinen, J., Tanskanen, A., Ervast, L., Heikkinen, E., Lyytinen, H., & Leppänen, P. (2014). Enhancement of brain event-related potentials to speech sounds is associated with compensated reading skills in dyslexic children with familial risk for dyslexia. <em>International Journal of Psychophysiology</em>, 94 (3), 298-310. <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijpsycho.2014.10.002">doi:10.1016/j.ijpsycho.2014.10.002</a>fi
dc.identifier.otherTUTKAID_63477
dc.identifier.urihttps://jyx.jyu.fi/handle/123456789/44544
dc.description.abstractSpecific reading disability, dyslexia, is a prevalent and heritable disorder impairing reading acquisition characterized by a phonological deficit. However, the underlying mechanism of how the impaired phonological processing mediates resulting dyslexia or reading disabilities remains still unclear. Using ERPs we studied speech sound processing of 30 dyslexic children with familial risk for dyslexia, 51 typically reading children with familial risk for dyslexia, and 58 typically reading control children. We found enhanced brain responses to shortening of a phonemic length in pseudo-words (/at:a/ vs. /ata/) in dyslexic children with familial risk as compared to other groups. The enhanced brain responses were associated with better performance in behavioral phonemic length discrimination task, as well as with better reading and writing accuracy. Source analyses revealed that the brain responses of sub-group of dyslexic children with largest responses originated from a more posterior area of the right temporal cortex as compared to the responses of the other participants. This is the first electrophysiological evidence for a possible compensatory speech perception mechanism in dyslexia. The best readers within the dyslexic group have probably developed alternative strategies which employ compensatory mechanisms substituting their possible earlier deficit in phonological processing and might therefore be able to perform better in phonemic length discrimination and reading and writing accuracy tasks. However, we speculate that for reading fluency compensatory mechanisms are not that easily built and dyslexic children remain slow readers during their adult life.fi
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherElsevier BV; International Organization of Psychophysiology
dc.relation.ispartofseriesInternational Journal of Psychophysiology
dc.subject.otherdyslexiafi
dc.subject.otherspeech perceptionfi
dc.subject.otherERPfi
dc.subject.otherEEGfi
dc.subject.otherphonemic length discriminationfi
dc.subject.othercompensationfi
dc.titleEnhancement of brain event-related potentials to speech sounds is associated with compensated reading skills in dyslexic children with familial risk for dyslexiafi
dc.typearticle
dc.identifier.urnURN:NBN:fi:jyu-201411063184
dc.contributor.laitosPsykologian laitosfi
dc.contributor.laitosDepartment of Psychologyen
dc.contributor.oppiainePsykologia
dc.type.urihttp://purl.org/eprint/type/SubmittedJournalArticle
dc.date.updated2014-11-06T04:30:11Z
dc.type.coarjournal article
dc.description.reviewstatuspeerReviewed
dc.format.pagerange298-310
dc.relation.issn0167-8760
dc.relation.numberinseries3
dc.relation.volume94
dc.type.versionacceptedVersion
dc.rights.copyright© Elsevier. This is a final draft version of an article whose final and definitive form has been published by Elsevier.
dc.rights.accesslevelopenAccessfi
dc.relation.doi10.1016/j.ijpsycho.2014.10.002


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