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dc.contributor.authorJuottonen, Heli
dc.contributor.authorKieman, Mirkka
dc.contributor.authorFritze, Hannu
dc.contributor.authorHamberg, Leena
dc.contributor.authorLaine, Anna M.
dc.contributor.authorMerilä, Päivi
dc.contributor.authorPeltoniemi, Krista
dc.contributor.authorPutkinen, Anuliina
dc.contributor.authorTuittila, Eeva-Stiina
dc.date.accessioned2021-10-29T08:56:22Z
dc.date.available2021-10-29T08:56:22Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.citationJuottonen, H., Kieman, M., Fritze, H., Hamberg, L., Laine, A. M., Merilä, P., Peltoniemi, K., Putkinen, A., & Tuittila, E.-S. (2021). Integrating Decomposers, Methane-Cycling Microbes and Ecosystem Carbon Fluxes Along a Peatland Successional Gradient in a Land Uplift Region. <i>Ecosystems</i>, <i>Early online</i>. <a href="https://doi.org/10.1007/s10021-021-00713-w" target="_blank">https://doi.org/10.1007/s10021-021-00713-w</a>
dc.identifier.otherCONVID_101671838
dc.identifier.urihttps://jyx.jyu.fi/handle/123456789/78426
dc.description.abstractPeatlands are carbon dioxide (CO2) sinks that, in parallel, release methane (CH4). The peatland carbon (C) balance depends on the interplay of decomposer and CH4-cycling microbes, vegetation, and environmental conditions. These interactions are susceptible to the changes that occur along a successional gradient from vascular plant-dominated systems to Sphagnum moss-dominated systems. Changes similar to this succession are predicted to occur from climate change. Here, we investigated how microbial and plant communities are interlinked with each other and with ecosystem C cycling along a successional gradient on a boreal land uplift coast. The gradient ranged from shoreline to meadows and fens, and further to bogs. Potential microbial activity (aerobic CO2 production; CH4 production and oxidation) and biomass were greatest in the early successional meadows, although their communities of aerobic decomposers (fungi, actinobacteria), methanogens, and methanotrophs did not differ from the older fens. Instead, the functional microbial communities shifted at the fen–bog transition concurrent with a sudden decrease in C fluxes. The successional patterns of decomposer versus CH4-cycling communities diverged at the bog stage, indicating strong but distinct microbial responses to Sphagnum dominance and acidity. We highlight young meadows as dynamic sites with the greatest microbial potential for C release. These hot spots of C turnover with dense sedge cover may represent a sensitive bottleneck in succession, which is necessary for eventual long-term peat accumulation. The distinctive microbes in bogs could serve as indicators of the C sink function in restoration measures that aim to stabilize the C in the peat.en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherSpringer Science+Business Media
dc.relation.ispartofseriesEcosystems
dc.rightsCC BY 4.0
dc.subject.otherecosystem respiration
dc.subject.othermethane emission
dc.subject.otherfungi
dc.subject.otheractinobacteria
dc.subject.othermethanogens
dc.subject.othermethanotrophs
dc.subject.othermicrobial biomass
dc.subject.othermicrobial community
dc.subject.otherprimary paludification
dc.subject.otherpeatland development.
dc.titleIntegrating Decomposers, Methane-Cycling Microbes and Ecosystem Carbon Fluxes Along a Peatland Successional Gradient in a Land Uplift Region
dc.typearticle
dc.identifier.urnURN:NBN:fi:jyu-202110295453
dc.contributor.laitosBio- ja ympäristötieteiden laitosfi
dc.contributor.laitosDepartment of Biological and Environmental Scienceen
dc.type.urihttp://purl.org/eprint/type/JournalArticle
dc.description.reviewstatuspeerReviewed
dc.relation.issn1432-9840
dc.relation.volumeEarly online
dc.type.versionpublishedVersion
dc.rights.copyright© Authors, 2021
dc.rights.accesslevelopenAccessfi
dc.subject.ysobiomassa (ekologia)
dc.subject.ysosienet
dc.subject.ysomikrobisto
dc.subject.ysobakteerit
dc.subject.ysometaani
dc.subject.ysoturvemaat
dc.subject.ysohiilinielut
dc.subject.ysohiilen kierto
dc.subject.ysomaankohoaminen
dc.format.contentfulltext
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p39245
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p90
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p27039
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p1749
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p13222
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p17343
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p21941
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p28986
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p11050
dc.rights.urlhttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.relation.doi10.1007/s10021-021-00713-w
jyx.fundinginformationThework was funded by the Academy of Finland(Projects 131409, 218101, 315415, 287039, and330840), funding from Kone Foundation to AML,and funding from the Finnish Society of ForestScience to MK.


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