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dc.contributor.authorMikkola, Tuija M.
dc.contributor.authorKautiainen, Hannu
dc.contributor.authorvon Bonsdorff, Mikaela B.
dc.contributor.authorSalonen, Minna K.
dc.contributor.authorWasenius, Niko
dc.contributor.authorKajantie, Eero
dc.contributor.authorEriksson, Johan G.
dc.date.accessioned2020-03-11T08:25:47Z
dc.date.available2020-03-11T08:25:47Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.citationMikkola, T. M., Kautiainen, H., von Bonsdorff, M. B., Salonen, M. K., Wasenius, N., Kajantie, E., & Eriksson, J. G. (2020). Body composition and changes in health-related quality of life in older age : a 10-year follow-up of the Helsinki Birth Cohort Study. <i>Quality of Life Research</i>, <i>29</i>(8), 2039-2050. <a href="https://doi.org/10.1007/s11136-020-02453-1" target="_blank">https://doi.org/10.1007/s11136-020-02453-1</a>
dc.identifier.otherCONVID_34941565
dc.identifier.urihttps://jyx.jyu.fi/handle/123456789/68130
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: Most studies examining the associations between body composition and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in older age have been cross-sectional and analyzed only fat or lean mass. Hence, it is poorly known whether fat and lean mass are independently associated with subsequent changes in HRQoL. We investigated whether baseline lean and fat mass are associated with changes in HRQoL over a 10-year period in older adults. METHODS: We studied 1044 men and women from the Helsinki Birth Cohort Study (age 57-70 years at baseline). Bioelectrical impedance analysis was used to derive baseline fat mass index (FMI, fat mass/height2) and lean mass index (lean mass/height2), dichotomized at sex-specific medians. HRQoL was assessed using RAND 36-item Health Survey at baseline and follow-up 10 years later. RESULTS: When controlled for lean mass and adjusted for potential confounders, high baseline FMI was associated with a greater decline in general health (standardized regression coefficient [β] = - 0.13, p = 0.001), physical functioning (β = - 0.11, p = 0.002), role physical (β = - 0.13, p = 0.003), vitality (β = - 0.08, p = 0.027), role emotional (β = - 0.12, p = 0.007), and physical component score (β = - 0.14, p < 0.001). High baseline FMI was also associated with low HRQoL in all physical domains at baseline (β: from - 0.38 to - 0.10). Lean mass was not strongly associated with HRQoL at baseline or change in HRQoL. CONCLUSION: In older community-dwelling adults, higher fat mass is, independent of lean mass, associated with lower physical HRQoL and greater decline in HRQoL. Prevention of adiposity may contribute to preservation of a good quality of life in older age.en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageeng
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherSpringer
dc.relation.ispartofseriesQuality of Life Research
dc.rightsCC BY 4.0
dc.subject.otheraging
dc.subject.otherbody composition
dc.subject.otherfat mass
dc.subject.otherhealth-related quality of life
dc.subject.otherlean mass
dc.subject.otherobesity
dc.titleBody composition and changes in health-related quality of life in older age : a 10-year follow-up of the Helsinki Birth Cohort Study
dc.typearticle
dc.identifier.urnURN:NBN:fi:jyu-202003112366
dc.contributor.laitosLiikuntatieteellinen tiedekuntafi
dc.contributor.laitosFaculty of Sport and Health Sciencesen
dc.contributor.oppiaineGerontologia ja kansanterveysfi
dc.contributor.oppiaineGerontology and Public Healthen
dc.type.urihttp://purl.org/eprint/type/JournalArticle
dc.description.reviewstatuspeerReviewed
dc.format.pagerange2039-2050
dc.relation.issn0962-9343
dc.relation.numberinseries8
dc.relation.volume29
dc.type.versionpublishedVersion
dc.rights.copyright© 2020 the Authors
dc.rights.accesslevelopenAccessfi
dc.subject.ysoelämänlaatu
dc.subject.ysoterveydentila
dc.subject.ysokehonkoostumus
dc.subject.ysolihasmassa
dc.subject.ysorasvakudokset
dc.subject.ysoikääntyminen
dc.subject.ysolihavuus
dc.format.contentfulltext
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p10759
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p11646
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p26989
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p29135
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p24382
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p5056
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p823
dc.rights.urlhttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.relation.doi10.1007/s11136-020-02453-1
jyx.fundinginformationOpen access funding provided by University of Helsinki including Helsinki University Central Hospital. This work was supported by Emil Aaltonen Foundation; Finnish Foundation for Diabetes Research; Foundation for Pediatric Research, Novo Nordisk Foundation; Signe and Ane Gyllenberg Foundation; Sigrid Jusélius Foundation; Samfundet Folkhälsan; Finska Läkaresällskapet; Liv och Hälsa; European Commission within the 7th Framework Programme (DORIAN, Grant Agreement No. 278603); and European Union Horizon 2020 programme (LifeCycle Grant No. 733206, DYNAHEALTH Grant No. 633595 and RECAP Grant No. SC1-2016-RTD-733180). The Academy of Finland supported EK (Grant Nos. 127437, 129306, 130326, 134791, 263924 and 274794); and J.G.E. (Grant Nos. 129369, 129907, 135072, 129255, and 126775).


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