Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorHämäläinen, Liisa
dc.contributor.authorRowland, Hannah M.
dc.contributor.authorMappes Johanna
dc.contributor.authorThorogood, Rose
dc.date.accessioned2019-11-06T11:27:34Z
dc.date.available2019-11-06T11:27:34Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.citationHämäläinen, Liisa; Rowland, Hannah M.; Mappes Johanna; Thorogood, Rose (2019). The effect of social information from live demonstrators compared to video playback on blue tit foraging decisions. PeerJ, 7, e7998. DOI: 10.7717/peerj.7998
dc.identifier.otherCONVID_33425539
dc.identifier.urihttps://jyx.jyu.fi/handle/123456789/66220
dc.description.abstractVideo playback provides a promising method to study social interactions, and the number of video playback experiments has been growing in recent years. Using videos has advantages over live individuals as it increases the repeatability of demonstrations, and enables researchers to manipulate the features of the presented stimulus. How observers respond to video playback might, however, differ among species, and the efficacy of video playback should be validated by investigating if individuals’ responses to videos are comparable to their responses to live demonstrators. Here, we use a novel foraging task to compare blue tits’ (Cyanistes caeruleus) responses to social information from a live conspecific vs video playback. Birds first received social information about the location of food, and were then presented with a three-choice foraging task where they could search for food from locations marked with different symbols (cross, square, plain white). Two control groups saw only a foraging tray with similar symbols but no information about the location of food. We predicted that socially educated birds would prefer the same location where a demonstrator had foraged, but we found no evidence that birds copied a demonstrator’s choice, regardless of how social information was presented. Social information, however, had an influence on blue tits’ foraging choices, as socially educated birds seemed to form a stronger preference for a square symbol (against two other options, cross and plain white) than the control birds. Our results suggest that blue tits respond to video playback of a conspecific similarly as to a live bird, but how they use this social information in their foraging decisions, remains unclear.en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageeng
dc.publisherPeerJ, Ltd.
dc.relation.ispartofseriesPeerJ
dc.rightsCC BY 4.0
dc.subject.otherblue tits
dc.subject.othersocial information
dc.subject.othersocial learning
dc.subject.othervideo playback
dc.titleThe effect of social information from live demonstrators compared to video playback on blue tit foraging decisions
dc.typearticle
dc.identifier.urnURN:NBN:fi:jyu-201911064751
dc.contributor.laitosBio- ja ympäristötieteiden laitosfi
dc.contributor.laitosDepartment of Biological and Environmental Scienceen
dc.contributor.oppiaineEkologia ja evoluutiobiologiafi
dc.contributor.oppiaineBiologisten vuorovaikutusten huippututkimusyksikköfi
dc.contributor.oppiaineEcology and Evolutionary Biologyen
dc.contributor.oppiaineCenter of Excellence in Biological Interactions Researchen
dc.type.urihttp://purl.org/eprint/type/JournalArticle
dc.description.reviewstatuspeerReviewed
dc.relation.issn2167-8359
dc.relation.volume7
dc.type.versionpublishedVersion
dc.rights.copyright© 2019 The Authors
dc.rights.accesslevelopenAccessfi
dc.relation.grantnumber320438
dc.relation.grantnumber284666
dc.subject.ysosinitiainen
dc.subject.ysososiaalinen oppiminen
dc.subject.ysokuvatallenteet
dc.subject.ysoeläinten käyttäytyminen
dc.format.contentfulltext
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p12446
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p16193
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p5962
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p18481
dc.rights.urlhttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.relation.datasethttps://doi.org/10.7717/peerj.7998/supp-2
dc.relation.doi10.7717/peerj.7998
dc.relation.funderSuomen Akatemiafi
dc.relation.funderSuomen Akatemiafi
dc.relation.funderAcademy of Finlanden
dc.relation.funderAcademy of Finlanden
jyx.fundingprogramAkatemiaprofessorin tutkimuskulut, SAfi
jyx.fundingprogramHuippuyksikkörahoitus, SAfi
jyx.fundingprogramResearch costs of Academy Professor, AoFen
jyx.fundingprogramCentre of Excellence, AoFen
jyx.fundinginformationLiisa Hämäläinen was funded by the Finnish Cultural Foundation and Emil Aaltonen Foundation. Hannah Rowland was supported by a research fellowship from the Institute of Zoology, and is currently supported by the Max Plank Society. Johanna Mappes was supported by the Academy of Finland (#284666 and #320438) and the University of Jyväskylä. Rose Thorogood was supported by an Independent Research Fellowship from the Natural Environment Research Council UK (NE/K00929X/1) and a start-up grant from the Helsinki Institute of Life Science (HiLIFE), University of Helsinki. The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

CC BY 4.0
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as CC BY 4.0