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dc.contributor.authorRantakokko, Merja
dc.contributor.authorIwarsson, Susanne
dc.contributor.authorSlaug, Björn
dc.contributor.authorNilsson, Maria H.
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-02T11:21:50Z
dc.date.available2019-10-02T11:21:50Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.citationRantakokko, M., Iwarsson, S., Slaug, B., & Nilsson, M. H. (2019). Life-space mobility in Parkinson’s disease : associations with motor and non-motor symptoms. <i>Journals of Gerontology. Series A: Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences</i>, <i>74</i>(4), 507-512. <a href="https://doi.org/10.1093/gerona/gly074" target="_blank">https://doi.org/10.1093/gerona/gly074</a>
dc.identifier.otherCONVID_27993165
dc.identifier.otherTUTKAID_77316
dc.identifier.urihttps://jyx.jyu.fi/handle/123456789/65729
dc.description.abstractBackground To describe life-space mobility and explore associations of motor and non-motor symptoms with life-space mobility in people with Parkinson’s disease (PD). Methods About 164 community-dwelling persons with PD (mean age 71.6 years, 64.6% men) received a postal survey and a subsequent home visit. Motor assessments included perceived walking difficulties (Walk-12G), mobility (Timed Up and Go test), motor symptoms (UPDRS-III), and freezing of gait (item 3, FOG-Qsa). Non-motor symptoms included depressive symptoms (GDS-15), pain, fatigue (NHP-EN), and global cognition (MoCA). Life-space mobility was assessed with the life-space assessment (LSA). Calculations included composite score (range 0–120; higher indicating better life-space mobility), independent life-space (range 0–5), assisted life-space (range 0–5), and maximal life-space (range 0–5). Associations were analyzed with linear regression models, adjusted for age, sex, and PD severity (Hoehn and Yahr). Results Mean life-space mobility score was 72.3 (SD = 28.8). Almost all participants (90%) reached the highest life-space level (beyond town). Half of these reached this level independently, while one-third were unable to move outside their bedroom without assistive devices or personal help. When adjusted for confounders, depressive symptoms, pain, and perceived walking difficulties was negatively associated with life-space mobility. In the multivariable model, only perceived walking difficulties were associated with life-space mobility. Conclusions Our findings indicate that perceived walking difficulties should be targeted to maintain or improve life-space mobility in people with PD. Depressive symptoms and pain may also merit consideration. More research is needed to elucidate the role of environmental and personal factors for life-space mobility in PD.fi
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherOxford University Press
dc.relation.ispartofseriesJournals of Gerontology. Series A: Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences
dc.rightsIn Copyright
dc.subject.otherassistive devices
dc.subject.otherwalking difficulties
dc.titleLife-space mobility in Parkinson’s disease : associations with motor and non-motor symptoms
dc.typearticle
dc.identifier.urnURN:NBN:fi:jyu-201909264270
dc.contributor.laitosLiikuntatieteellinen tiedekuntafi
dc.contributor.laitosFaculty of Sport and Health Sciencesen
dc.contributor.oppiaineGerontologia ja kansanterveysfi
dc.contributor.oppiaineGerontology and Public Healthen
dc.type.urihttp://purl.org/eprint/type/JournalArticle
dc.date.updated2019-09-26T12:15:14Z
dc.description.reviewstatuspeerReviewed
dc.format.pagerange507-512
dc.relation.issn1079-5006
dc.relation.numberinseries4
dc.relation.volume74
dc.type.versionacceptedVersion
dc.rights.copyright© 2018 Oxford University Press
dc.rights.accesslevelopenAccessfi
dc.subject.ysoliikkuvuus
dc.subject.ysoliikuntakyky
dc.subject.ysoosallistuminen
dc.subject.ysoapuvälineet
dc.subject.ysoelämänlaatu
dc.subject.ysoParkinsonin tauti
dc.format.contentfulltext
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p252
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p22622
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p10727
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p9044
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p10759
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p294
dc.rights.urlhttp://rightsstatements.org/page/InC/1.0/?language=en
dc.relation.doi10.1093/gerona/gly074
jyx.fundinginformationThis work was supported by a personal grants to (M.R.) from the Academy of Finland (grant number 285747); and Ministry of Education and Culture. The Home and Health in Parkinson’s Disease Project was funded to (M.H.N. and S.I.) from the Strategic Research Area in neuroscience at Lund University (MultiPark); the Swedish Research Council; the Ribbingska Foundation in Lund; the Greta and Johan Kock Foundation; the Swedish Association of Persons with Neurological Disabilities (N.H.R.); Norrbacka-Eugenia Foundation; NEURO Sweden; and the Swedish Parkinson Foundation. This work was conducted in the context of the Centre for Ageing and Supportive Environments (CASE), financed by the Swedish Research Council for Health Care, Working Life, and Welfare (Forte). The financial sponsors played no role in the design, execution, analysis or interpretation of data, or writing of the study.


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