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dc.contributor.authorWaselius, Tomi
dc.contributor.authorWikgren, Jan
dc.contributor.authorPenttonen, Markku
dc.contributor.authorNokia, Miriam
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-05T08:34:05Z
dc.date.available2020-04-26T21:35:17Z
dc.date.issued2019fi
dc.identifier.citationWaselius, T., Wikgren, J., Penttonen, M., & Nokia, M. (2019). Breathe out and learn : Expiration-contingent stimulus presentation facilitates associative learning in trace eyeblink conditioning. <em>Psychophysiology</em>, 56 (9), e13387. <a href="https://doi.org/10.1111/psyp.13387">doi:10.1111/psyp.13387</a>fi
dc.identifier.otherTUTKAID_81304
dc.identifier.urihttps://jyx.jyu.fi/handle/123456789/65425
dc.description.abstractRhythmic variation in heart rate and respiratory pattern are coupled in a way that optimizes the level of oxygen in the blood stream of the lungs and the body as well as saves energy in pulmonary gas exchange. It has been suggested that the cardiac cycle and respiratory pattern are coupled to neural oscillations of the brain. Yet, studies on how this rhythmic coupling is related to behavior are scarce. There is some evidence that, for example, the phase of respiration affects memory retrieval and the electrophysiological oscillatory state of the limbic system. It is also known that the phase of the cardiac cycle and hippocampal electrophysiological oscillations alone affect learning. Here, we studied whether the timing of training trials to different phases of respiration affects learning trace eyeblink conditioning in healthy adult humans. Trials consisting of a neutral conditioned stimulus (200‐ms tone) and a slightly aversive unconditioned stimulus (100‐ms air puff toward the eye), presented with a 600‐ms trace interval, were timed to either inspiration or expiration. A control group was trained regardless of respiratory phase. We found that, at the end of training, the rate of conditioned responses was higher in the group trained at expiration than it was in the other two groups. That is, brain state seems to fluctuate as a function of respiratory rhythm, and this fluctuation is also behaviorally relevant, exerting its effect on, at the least, a simple form of associative learning.fi
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
dc.relation.ispartofseriesPsychophysiology
dc.rightsIn Copyright
dc.subject.otherpsykofysiologiafi
dc.subject.othermuistifi
dc.subject.otherehdollistuminenfi
dc.subject.otherhengitysfi
dc.subject.othersykefi
dc.subject.othermemoryfi
dc.subject.otherrespirationfi
dc.subject.otherrespiratory sinus arrhythmiafi
dc.titleBreathe out and learn : Expiration-contingent stimulus presentation facilitates associative learning in trace eyeblink conditioningfi
dc.typearticle
dc.identifier.urnURN:NBN:fi:jyu-201909034008
dc.contributor.laitosPsykologian laitosfi
dc.contributor.laitosDepartment of Psychologyen
dc.contributor.oppiainePsykologia
dc.type.urihttp://purl.org/eprint/type/JournalArticle
dc.date.updated2019-09-03T09:15:26Z
dc.description.reviewstatuspeerReviewed
dc.relation.issn0048-5772
dc.relation.numberinseries9
dc.relation.volume56
dc.type.versionacceptedVersion
dc.rights.copyright© 2019 Society for Psychophysiological Research
dc.rights.accesslevelopenAccessfi
dc.format.contentfulltext
dc.rights.urlhttp://rightsstatements.org/page/InC/1.0/?language=en
dc.relation.doi10.1111/psyp.13387


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