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dc.contributor.authorRojas Zuluaga, Bibiana
dc.contributor.authorMappes, Johanna
dc.contributor.authorE., Burdfield-Steel
dc.date.accessioned2019-03-08T07:26:25Z
dc.date.available2019-03-08T07:26:25Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.citationRojas Zuluaga, B., Mappes, J., & E., B.-S. (2019). Multiple modalities in insect warning displays have additive effects against wild avian predators. <i>Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology</i>, <i>73</i>(3), Article 37. <a href="https://doi.org/10.1007/s00265-019-2643-6" target="_blank">https://doi.org/10.1007/s00265-019-2643-6</a>
dc.identifier.otherCONVID_28924604
dc.identifier.otherTUTKAID_80680
dc.identifier.urihttps://jyx.jyu.fi/handle/123456789/63072
dc.description.abstractAllocation to different components of defence has been suggested as an explanation for the existence of multiple aposematic morphs in a single population. We tested whether there are trade-offs between warning colouration and chemical defence or whether these have an additive effect when combined, using blue tits (Cyanistes caeruleus) as predators and the polymorphic wood tiger moth (Arctia plantaginis) as prey. We used artificial edible models (with and without the moths’ defensive fluids) with paper wings whose colour and pattern properties matched those of real moths. When the models were presented sans defensive fluids or when the fluids were presented without colour cues, we detected no differences in initial avoidance between the two morphs. However, when the colour and chemical cues were combined, differences emerged. White wings elicited higher latency to approach regardless of the defensive fluids applied on them. After approach, however, the defensive fluids of both morphs presented on moth models elicited higher latency to attack than a water control, hinting at a repellent odour. Fluids of white moths rendered lower amounts of prey eaten regardless of wing colour, while yellow moths’ fluids provoked the highest occurrence of beak wiping behaviour. Our findings highlight the importance of accounting for interactive effects between different signal modalities, as these can create patterns not detectable when examined in isolation. Understanding these interactions is vital to determine how different components of multimodal warning displays provide protection at different stages of a predation event and, potentially, how multiple morphs can co-occur in a population.fi
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherSpringer
dc.relation.ispartofseriesBehavioral Ecology and Sociobiology
dc.rightsCC BY 4.0
dc.subject.otherpuolustusmekanismit (biologia)fi
dc.subject.othervaroitusvärifi
dc.subject.otherhyönteisetfi
dc.subject.otherdefence mechanisms (biological phenomena)fi
dc.subject.otherwarning colorationfi
dc.subject.otherinsectsfi
dc.titleMultiple modalities in insect warning displays have additive effects against wild avian predators
dc.typearticle
dc.identifier.urnURN:NBN:fi:jyu-201903011681
dc.contributor.laitosBio- ja ympäristötieteiden laitosfi
dc.contributor.laitosDepartment of Biological and Environmental Scienceen
dc.contributor.oppiaineEkologia ja evoluutiobiologiafi
dc.contributor.oppiaineBiologisten vuorovaikutusten huippututkimusyksikköfi
dc.contributor.oppiaineEcology and Evolutionary Biologyen
dc.contributor.oppiaineCentre of Excellence in Biological Interactions Researchen
dc.type.urihttp://purl.org/eprint/type/JournalArticle
dc.date.updated2019-03-01T13:15:33Z
dc.description.reviewstatuspeerReviewed
dc.relation.issn0340-5443
dc.relation.numberinseries3
dc.relation.volume73
dc.type.versionpublishedVersion
dc.rights.copyright© The Author(s) 2019
dc.rights.accesslevelopenAccessfi
dc.relation.grantnumber284666
dc.subject.ysohyönteiset
dc.subject.ysopuolustusmekanismit (biologia)
dc.subject.ysovaroitusväri
dc.format.contentfulltext
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p1983
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p6078
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p27907
dc.rights.urlhttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.relation.doi10.1007/s00265-019-2643-6
dc.relation.funderSuomen Akatemiafi
dc.relation.funderAcademy of Finlanden
jyx.fundingprogramHuippuyksikkörahoitus, SAfi
jyx.fundingprogramCentre of Excellence, AoFen
jyx.fundinginformationThis study was funded by the Academy of Finland via the Centre of Excellence in Biological Interactions (Project No. 252411). BR is currently funded by the Academy of Finland (Academy Research Fellowship, Project No. 21000042021).


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