Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorSoliman, Wael
dc.contributor.authorRinta-Kahila, Tapani
dc.date.accessioned2019-02-12T10:15:54Z
dc.date.available2019-02-12T10:15:54Z
dc.date.issued2018fi
dc.identifier.citationSoliman, W., & Rinta-Kahila, T. (2018). Unethical But Not Illegal : Uncovering the Persuasive Messages Leveraged by Providers of the 'Real' Online Social Impressions. In <em>ECIS 2018 : Proceedings of the 26th European Conference on Information Systems, Portsmouth, UK, 23-28 June</em> (pp. 172). European Conference on Information Systems. Retrieved from <a href="https://aisel.aisnet.org/ecis2018_rp/172">https://aisel.aisnet.org/ecis2018_rp/172</a>fi
dc.identifier.otherTUTKAID_79678
dc.identifier.urihttps://jyx.jyu.fi/handle/123456789/62758
dc.description.abstractDue to the drastically elevated prominence of social networking sites (SNS), online social impressions such as views, comments, followers, subscribers, likes, and dislikes have become a valuable currency that translates to popularity, credibility, and even financial gains. Aside from machine-generated impressions, a growing industry known as crowdturfing utilizes human workers to provide “real” social impressions as-a-service. Although crowdturfing platforms are often seen as a clear example of deceptive conduct, they justify their business by leveraging well-crafted persuasive strategies and ethical appeals. Given the increasingly significant role of online impressions on shaping people’s views and opinions, the servitization of these impressions calls for a clearer understanding. To address this call, we set out to investigate 1) What persuasive strategies do crowdturfing agents leverage to promote their service offerings?; and 2) To what extent these offerings can be ethically justified? Our analysis reveals utilization of three key persuasive strategies – namely, educational messages, bragging messages, and reassuring messages. Moreover, we find that they use various ethical appeals which largely depend on the conception of what ‘real’ means. The theoretical and practical significance of these findings are discussed.fi
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherEuropean Conference on Information Systems
dc.relation.ispartofECIS 2018 : Proceedings of the 26th European Conference on Information Systems, Portsmouth, UK, 23-28 June
dc.relation.urihttps://aisel.aisnet.org/ecis2018_rp/172
dc.rightsIn Copyright
dc.subject.otherjoukkoistaminenfi
dc.subject.othereettisyysfi
dc.subject.othersosiaaliset verkostotfi
dc.subject.otherasiakkaatfi
dc.subject.otherpalautefi
dc.subject.otherarvostelut (tuotokset)fi
dc.subject.othercrowdturfingfi
dc.subject.otherethicsfi
dc.subject.otherethics theoryfi
dc.subject.otheronline social impressionsfi
dc.subject.otherbyuing real viewsfi
dc.subject.othercontent analysisfi
dc.subject.otherqualityfi
dc.titleUnethical But Not Illegal : Uncovering the Persuasive Messages Leveraged by Providers of the 'Real' Online Social Impressionsfi
dc.typeconferenceObject
dc.identifier.urnURN:NBN:fi:jyu-201901281315
dc.contributor.laitosInformaatioteknologian tiedekuntafi
dc.contributor.laitosFaculty of Information Technologyen
dc.contributor.oppiaineTietojärjestelmätiede
dc.type.urihttp://purl.org/eprint/type/ConferencePaper
dc.date.updated2019-01-28T07:15:11Z
dc.relation.isbn978-1-86137-667-1
dc.description.reviewstatuspeerReviewed
dc.type.versionFinal Draft
dc.rights.copyright© The Authors, 2018.
dc.rights.accesslevelopenAccessfi
dc.relation.conferenceEuropean Conference on Information Systems
dc.format.contentfulltext
dc.rights.urlhttp://rightsstatements.org/page/InC/1.0/?language=en


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

In Copyright
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as In Copyright