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dc.contributor.authorBöckerman, Petri
dc.contributor.authorViinikainen, Jutta
dc.contributor.authorPulkki-Råback, Laura
dc.contributor.authorHakulinen, Christian
dc.contributor.authorPitkänen, Niina
dc.contributor.authorLehtimäki, Terho
dc.contributor.authorPehkonen, Jaakko
dc.contributor.authorRaitakari, Olli T.
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-30T05:46:28Z
dc.date.available2018-06-21T21:35:48Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.citationBöckerman, P., Viinikainen, J., Pulkki-Råback, L., Hakulinen, C., Pitkänen, N., Lehtimäki, T., . . . , & Raitakari, O. T. (2017). Does higher education protect against obesity? Evidence using Mendelian randomization. <em>Preventive Medicine</em>, 101, 195-198. <a href="https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ypmed.2017.06.015">doi:10.1016/j.ypmed.2017.06.015</a>
dc.identifier.otherTUTKAID_74257
dc.identifier.urihttps://jyx.jyu.fi/handle/123456789/54755
dc.description.abstractObjectives The aim of this explorative study was to examine the effect of education on obesity using Mendelian randomization. Methods Participants (N = 2011) were from the on-going nationally representative Young Finns Study (YFS) that began in 1980 when six cohorts (aged 30, 33, 36, 39, 42 and 45 in 2007) were recruited. The average value of BMI (kg/m2) measurements in 2007 and 2011 and genetic information were linked to comprehensive register-based information on the years of education in 2007. We first used a linear regression (Ordinary Least Squares, OLS) to estimate the relationship between education and BMI. To identify a causal relationship, we exploited Mendelian randomization and used a genetic score as an instrument for education. The genetic score was based on 74 genetic variants that genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have found to be associated with the years of education. Because the genotypes are randomly assigned at conception, the instrument causes exogenous variation in the years of education and thus enables identification of causal effects. Results The years of education in 2007 were associated with lower BMI in 2007/2011 (regression coefficient (b) = − 0.22; 95% Confidence Intervals [CI] = − 0.29, − 0.14) according to the linear regression results. The results based on Mendelian randomization suggests that there may be a negative causal effect of education on BMI (b = − 0.84; 95% CI = − 1.77, 0.09). Conclusion The findings indicate that education could be a protective factor against obesity in advanced countries.
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.relation.ispartofseriesPreventive Medicine
dc.subject.otherkoulutus
dc.subject.otherylipaino
dc.subject.othereducation
dc.subject.otherschooling
dc.subject.otherobesity
dc.subject.otherbody weight
dc.subject.otherBMI
dc.subject.otherwaist-hip ratio
dc.titleDoes higher education protect against obesity? Evidence using Mendelian randomization
dc.typearticle
dc.identifier.urnURN:NBN:fi:jyu-201706283156
dc.contributor.laitosKauppakorkeakoulufi
dc.contributor.laitosSchool of Business and Economicsen
dc.contributor.oppiaineBasic or discovery scholarship
dc.contributor.oppiaineTaloustiede
dc.type.urihttp://purl.org/eprint/type/JournalArticle
dc.date.updated2017-06-28T12:15:12Z
dc.type.coarjournal article
dc.description.reviewstatuspeerReviewed
dc.format.pagerange195-198
dc.relation.issn0091-7435
dc.relation.volume101
dc.type.versionacceptedVersion
dc.rights.copyright© 2016 Published by Elsevier Inc. This is a final draft version of an article whose final and definitive form has been published by Elsevier. Published in this repository with the kind permission of the publisher.
dc.rights.accesslevelopenAccessfi
dc.relation.doi10.1016/j.ypmed.2017.06.015


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