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dc.contributor.authorMännistö, Minna
dc.contributor.authorGanzert, Lars
dc.contributor.authorTiirola, Marja
dc.contributor.authorHäggblom, Max M.
dc.contributor.authorStark, Sari
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-02T09:59:29Z
dc.date.available2018-03-03T22:45:10Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.citationMännistö, M., Ganzert, L., Tiirola, M., Häggblom, M. M., & Stark, S. (2016). Do shifts in life strategies explain microbial community responses to increasing nitrogen in tundra soil?. <i>Soil Biology and Biochemistry</i>, <i>96</i>, 216-228. <a href="https://doi.org/10.1016/j.soilbio.2016.02.012" target="_blank">https://doi.org/10.1016/j.soilbio.2016.02.012</a>
dc.identifier.otherCONVID_25576381
dc.identifier.otherTUTKAID_69337
dc.identifier.urihttps://jyx.jyu.fi/handle/123456789/52570
dc.description.abstractSubarctic tundra soils store large quantities of the global organic carbon (C) pool as the decomposition of plant litter and soil organic matter is limited by low temperatures and limiting nutrients. Mechanisms that drive organic matter decomposition are still poorly understood due to our limited knowledge of microbial communities and their responses to changing conditions. In subarctic tundra large grazers, in particular reindeer, exert a strong effect on vegetation and nutrient availability causing drastic nutrient pulses in the soils located along the migratory routes. Here we studied the effect of increased nitrogen (N) availability on microbial community structure and activities by laboratory incubations of soil collected from two sites with contrasting grazing intensities. We hypothesized that heavily grazed soil experiencing nutrient pulses harbor more copiotrophic taxa that are able to respond positively to increases in available N leading to increased enzyme activities and respiration. Contrary to our hypothesis, there were only minor differences in the microbial community composition between the lightly and heavily grazed soils. N amendment shifted the bacterial community composition drastically, but the changes were similar at both grazing intensities. The relative abundance of diverse Actinobacteria and Rhodanobacter-affiliated Gammaproteobacteria increased in the N amended microcosms, while the abundance of Acidobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, Deltaproteobacteria, Verrucomicrobia and Bacteroidetes decreased. Contrary to our hypotheses, increased N availability decreased respiration and microbial biomass at both grazing intensities, while increased N availability had little influence on the extracellular enzyme activities. We propose that similar to what has been reported in other systems, elevated N availability suppressed microbial respiration and biomass by favoring copiotrophic species with faster growth rates and with limited capabilities to decompose recalcitrant organic matter. Similar responses in soils from contrasting vegetation types, soil organic matter (SOM) quality and N availabilities in response to grazing intensity indicate that nutrient pulses may have a strong direct impact on the microbial communities. Responses detected using laboratory incubations are likely amplified in the field where the direct effect of increased N availability is combined with increase in labile C through changes in plant production and species composition.
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherElsevier Ltd.
dc.relation.ispartofseriesSoil Biology and Biochemistry
dc.subject.otherbacterial communities
dc.subject.otherPLFA
dc.subject.otherenzyme activities
dc.subject.otherqPCR
dc.subject.othernext generation sequencing
dc.titleDo shifts in life strategies explain microbial community responses to increasing nitrogen in tundra soil?
dc.typearticle
dc.identifier.urnURN:NBN:fi:jyu-201612225244
dc.contributor.laitosBio- ja ympäristötieteiden laitosfi
dc.contributor.laitosDepartment of Biological and Environmental Scienceen
dc.contributor.oppiaineAkvaattiset tieteetfi
dc.contributor.oppiaineAquatic Sciencesen
dc.type.urihttp://purl.org/eprint/type/JournalArticle
dc.date.updated2016-12-22T13:15:08Z
dc.type.coarjournal article
dc.description.reviewstatuspeerReviewed
dc.format.pagerange216-228
dc.relation.issn0038-0717
dc.relation.numberinseries0
dc.relation.volume96
dc.type.versionacceptedVersion
dc.rights.copyright© 2016 Elsevier Ltd. This is a final draft version of an article whose final and definitive form has been published by Elsevier. Published in this repository with the kind permission of the publisher.
dc.rights.accesslevelopenAccessfi
dc.relation.grantnumber615146
dc.relation.grantnumber615146
dc.relation.projectidinfo:eu-repo/grantAgreement/EC/FP7/615146/EU//
dc.subject.ysotundra
dc.subject.ysotyppi
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p16902
jyx.subject.urihttp://www.yso.fi/onto/yso/p10988
dc.relation.doi10.1016/j.soilbio.2016.02.012
dc.relation.funderEuroopan komissiofi
dc.relation.funderEuropean Commissionen
jyx.fundingprogramEU:n 7. puiteohjelma (FP7)fi
jyx.fundingprogramFP7 (EU's 7th Framework Programme)en
jyx.fundinginformationThis study was funded by the Academy of Finland grants to MM, MH and SS (decision numbers 130507, 218121 and 252323) and ERC consolidator grant 615146 to MT. We thank Sukhitar Rajan for the help in handling the sequence data.


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