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dc.contributor.authorWoods, Naomi
dc.date.accessioned2016-11-15T08:37:33Z
dc.date.available2016-11-15T08:37:33Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.isbn978-951-39-6846-5
dc.identifier.otheroai:jykdok.linneanet.fi:1642847
dc.identifier.urihttps://jyx.jyu.fi/handle/123456789/51882
dc.description.abstractMultiple passwords are an increasing security issue that will only get worse with time. One of the major factors that compromise multiple passwords is users’ memory, and the behaviors they adopt to compensate for its failures. Through studying memory elements that influence users’ password memorability, we may increase our understanding of the user and therefore make proposals to increase the security of the password authentication mechanism. This dissertation examines the human memory to understand password security behaviors; and moreover, develops new theories and revises prominent memory theories for the password context. This research employs memory theories to not only increase the memorability of passwords, but to also improve the security of them by means of three studies that examine users’ beliefs and awareness (metamemory) about how their memory affects their password memorability and insecure password behavior; and look to increasing password memorability through improving learning (repetition through verification), and retrieval (through uniqueness). Empirical longitudinal studies collecting objective and subjective data measuring password recall (over 10000 passwords), memory interference, memory performance, memory beliefs, user convenience, and insecure password behavior. Through collecting objective password recall data, the results of these studies challenge users’ preconceptions about justifying their adoption of insecure password behaviors. Furthermore, it challenges the assumption of trade-offs between password security, memorability and user convenience found in previous password research. In meeting the objectives of the dissertation, this research has significant practical implications for organizations and individual users. Through a greater understanding of the human memory this can inform users to adopt better password security practices. The implications of these results suggest how to increase password memorability, how to decrease password forgetting, and how to decrease insecure password behaviors and the consequences of such insecure behaviors (such as security breaches).
dc.format.extent1 verkkoaineisto (151 sivua)
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherUniversity of Jyväskylä
dc.relation.ispartofseriesJyväskylä studies in computing
dc.relation.isversionofJulkaistu myös painettuna.
dc.subject.othermuistiteoriat
dc.subject.othermetamuisti
dc.subject.otherpassword security
dc.subject.otherpassword memorability
dc.subject.otheruser convenience
dc.subject.othermemory theories
dc.subject.otheruser memory
dc.subject.othermetamemory
dc.subject.otherinterference
dc.subject.otherrepetition
dc.subject.otherpassword reuse
dc.subject.otherunique passwords
dc.titleImproving the security of multiple passwords through a greater understanding of the human memory
dc.identifier.urnURN:ISBN:978-951-39-6846-5
dc.type.dcmitypeTexten
dc.type.ontasotVäitöskirjafi
dc.type.ontasotDoctoral dissertationen
dc.contributor.tiedekuntaInformaatioteknologian tiedekuntafi
dc.contributor.yliopistoUniversity of Jyväskyläen
dc.contributor.yliopistoJyväskylän yliopistofi
dc.contributor.oppiaineKognitiotiedefi
dc.relation.issn1456-5390
dc.relation.numberinseries249
dc.rights.accesslevelopenAccessfi
dc.subject.ysotietoturva
dc.subject.ysosalasanat
dc.subject.ysokäytettävyys
dc.subject.ysomuisti
dc.subject.ysomuistaminen
dc.subject.ysounohtaminen
dc.subject.ysokäytettävyys


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